Efstrathios Karagiannis

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Background The aim of this non-interventional study was to document the impact of a sublingual allergen immunotherapy (AIT) with Oralair 5-grass pollen tablets (Stallergenes, France) on symptom severity (rhinitis, conjunctivitis, asthma), use of symptomatic medication and tolerability in patients with grass pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (RC)(More)
OBJECTIVES To document the effectiveness and safety of sublingual allergen immunotherapy (SLIT) with a five-grass pollen tablet (Oralair ) and compare different treatment options in a broad, non-selected population of patients in a real-world clinical setting. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a 2 year, open, prospective, multicenter, single-arm,(More)
INTRODUCTION Allergen immunotherapy is the only treatment option for allergic rhinitis with disease-altering potential. It was the objective of this study to assess the effectiveness and tolerability of a 5-grass pollen tablet in a large population of non-selected grass pollen allergic patients, i.e. patients with different clinical profiles in daily(More)
BACKGROUND The safety and efficacy of pre- and coseasonal sublingual allergen immunotherapy (SLIT) with a 5-grass pollen sublingual tablet have been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) in children and adolescents. Observational, 'real-life' studies can usefully complement the results of RCTs. METHODS A prospective, open-label, observational,(More)
BACKGROUND Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is a safe/well-tolerated alternative to allergen injection immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC). Patient adherence is essential and patient-related outcome measures including treatment satisfaction are informative/indicative of adherence. OBJECTIVE The aim was to assess treatment satisfaction with(More)
Background The aim of this non-interventional study was to document the impact of a sublingual allergen immunotherapy (AIT) with Oralair 5-grass pollen tablets (Stallergenes, France) on symptom severity, use of symptomatic medication and tolerability in patients with grass pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (RC) over 2 years of routine medical(More)
BACKGROUND Although the safety and efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) with a five-grass pollen tablet have been demonstrated in randomized clinical trials (RCTs), these outcomes must always be evaluated in real-life medical practice. METHODS In a prospective, open-label, noninterventional, "real-life" study in Germany, we evaluated the safety,(More)
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