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  • Influence
What are you looking for?: an eye-tracking study of information usage in web search
TLDR
It was found that adding information to the contextual snippet significantly improved performance for informational tasks but degraded performance for navigational tasks.
Drag-and-Pop and Drag-and-Pick: Techniques for Accessing Remote Screen Content on Touch- and Pen-Operated Systems
TLDR
The results of a user study comparing drag-and-pop with traditional drag- and-drop on a 15' (4.50m) wide interactive display wall are reported, showing participants where able to file icons up to 3.7 times faster when using the drag-And-pop interface.
Intermediated technology use in developing communities
We describe a prevalent mode of information access in low-income communities of the developing world--intermediated interactions. They enable persons for whom technology is inaccessible due to
What do you see when you're surfing?: using eye tracking to predict salient regions of web pages
TLDR
An eye-tracking study is presented in which 20 users viewed 361 Web pages while engaged in information foraging and page recognition tasks, and the concept of fixation impact is introduced, a new method for mapping gaze data to visual scenes that is motivated by findings in vision research.
An eye tracking study of the effect of target rank on web search
TLDR
It was found that when targets were placed relatively low in the first page of search results, people spent more time searching and were less successful in finding the target, especially for informational tasks.
Mobile-izing health workers in rural India
TLDR
Evidence is shown that the creation and use of videos did help engage village women in dialogue, show positive effects toward health worker motivation and learning, and motivate key community influencers to participate in promoting the health workers.
Notification, Disruption, and Memory: Effects of Messaging Interruptions on Memory and Performance
TLDR
It is shown that interruptions coming early during a search task are more likely to result in the user forgetting the primary task goal than interruptions that arrive later on, which has implications for the design of user interfaces and notification policies that minimize the disruptiveness of notifications.
The good, the bad, and the random: an eye-tracking study of ad quality in web search
TLDR
Understanding of how attention devoted to search results is influenced by other page elements, and how previous search experiences influence how people attend to the current page is further understood.
Instant Messaging and Interruption: Influence of Task Type on Performance
TLDR
It is shown that notifications are more disruptive for fast, stimulus-driven search tasks than for slower, more effortful semantic-based search tasks and alternative hypotheses about the nature of disruption for a list evaluation task are investigated.
Stuff I've Seen: A System for Personal Information Retrieval and Re-Use
TLDR
The design and evaluation of a system, called Stuff I've Seen (SIS), that facilitates information re-use and provides a unified index of information that a person has seen, whether it was seen as email, web page, document, appointment, etc.
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