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Fossil evidence for an ancient divergence of lorises and galagos
TLDR
The first demonstrable crown strepsirrhines from the Afro-Arabian Palaeogene are described—a galagid and a possible lorisid from the late middle Eocene of Egypt, the latter of which provides the earliest fossil evidence for the distinctive strepsIRrhine toothcomb. Expand
Basal Anthropoids from Egypt and the Antiquity of Africa's Higher Primate Radiation
TLDR
Biretia is unique among early anthropoids in exhibiting evidence for nocturnality, but derived dental features shared with younger parapithecids draw this genus, and possibly >45-million-year-old Algeripithecus, into a morphologically and behaviorally diverse parapithecoid clade of great antiquity. Expand
Revised age estimates for the later Paleogene mammal faunas of Egypt and Oman.
  • E. Seiffert
  • Geography, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences…
  • 28 March 2006
The Jebel Qatrani Formation of northern Egypt has produced Afro-Arabia's primary record of Paleogene mammalian evolution, including the world's most complete remains of early anthropoid primates.Expand
Palaeontological evidence for an Oligocene divergence between Old World monkeys and apes
TLDR
The oldest known fossil ‘ape’ is described, represented by a partial mandible preserving dental features that place it with ‘nyanzapithecine’ stem hominoids, and the oldest stem member of the Old World monkey clade is reported, representing by a lower third molar. Expand
A new estimate of afrotherian phylogeny based on simultaneous analysis of genomic, morphological, and fossil evidence
  • E. Seiffert
  • Biology, Medicine
  • BMC Evolutionary Biology
  • 13 November 2007
TLDR
There may, nevertheless, be more morphological character support for crown Afrotheria than is currently assumed; the features identified here as possible afrotherian synapomorphies can be further scrutinized through future phylogenetic analyses with broader taxon sampling, as well as recovery of primitive fossil afroTherians from the Afro-Arabian landmass. Expand
Oligocene mammals from Ethiopia and faunal exchange between Afro-Arabia and Eurasia
TLDR
A late Oligocene fossil assemblage from Ethiopia is reported, which constrains the migration to postdate 27 Myr ago, and yields new insight into the indigenous faunal dynamics that preceded this event. Expand
Craniodental Morphology and Systematics of a New Family of Hystricognathous Rodents (Gaudeamuridae) from the Late Eocene and Early Oligocene of Egypt
TLDR
The oldest known remains of Gaudeamus are described, including largely complete but crushed crania and complete upper and lower dentitions, and Gaudeamurids are the only known crown hystricognaths from Afro-Arabia that are likely to be aligned with non-phiomorph members of that clade, and as such provide additional support for an Afro -Arabian origin of advanced stem and basal crown members of Hysticognathi. Expand
New Bats (Mammalia: Chiroptera) from the Late Eocene and Early Oligocene, Fayum Depression, Egypt
TLDR
Four new genera and six new species of microchiropteran bats are described here from the late Eocene (37–34 Ma) of the Fayum Depression in northern Egypt, including the first and only African record of a fossil rhinopomatid and the earliest African records of megadermatids, emballonurids, and vespertilionids. Expand
Early primate evolution in Afro‐Arabia
  • E. Seiffert
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolutionary anthropology
  • 1 November 2012
TLDR
Newly discovered fossils indicate that the persistence and later diversification of Anthropoidea was not an inevitable result of the clade's competitive isolation or adaptive superiority, as has often been assumed, but rather was as much due to the combined influences of serendipitous geographic conditions, global cooling, and competition with a group of distantly related extinct strepsirrhines with anthropoid‐like adaptations known as adapiforms. Expand
Additional remains of Wadilemur elegans, a primitive stem galagid from the late Eocene of Egypt.
TLDR
Wadilemur's known dental and postcranial morphology provides additional support for the hypothesis that galagids and lorisids had diverged by the close of the middle Eocene, and, by bolstering the approximately 37 million-year-old calibration point for crown lorisiform origins provided by Saharagalago, indirect support for an ancient origin of crown Strepsirrhini and crown Primates. Expand
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