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Plumage Reflectance and the Objective Assessment of Avian Sexual Dichromatism
TLDR
This study revealed previously unnoticed sex differences in plumage coloration and the nature of iridescent and noniridescent sex differences, which has important implications for classifications of animals as mono‐ or dimorphic and for taxonomic and conservation purposes.
Colour vision in the passeriform bird, Leiothrix lutea: correlation of visual pigment absorbance and oil droplet transmission with spectral sensitivity
TLDR
Comparison of these results with the behavioural spectral sensitivity function of Leiothrix lutea suggests that the increment threshold photopic spectral sensitivity of this avian species is mediated by the 4 single cone classes modified by neural opponent mechanisms.
Ultraviolet vision and mate choice in zebra finches
TLDR
It is found that the ultraviolet is used, and that it probably contributes to hue perception in avian mate-choice decisions, and supports one hypothesized function of avian ultraviolet vision.
Innate colour preferences of flower visitors
TLDR
Weighting the spectral reflection of coloured objects by the spectral composition of the ambient light and the spectral sensitivity of the flower visitors' photoreceptors allows the calculation of the effective stimuli.
Spectral sensitivities including the ultraviolet of the passeriform bird Leiothrix lutea
  • E. Maier
  • Biology
    Journal of Comparative Physiology A
  • 1 July 1992
TLDR
Spectral sensitivity functions of a passeriform bird, the Red-billed Leiothrix Leiothsrix lutea (Timalidae) were determined in a behavioural test under different background illuminations and the biological significance of the high UV sensitivity is discussed.
The spectral sensitivity of a passerine bird is highest in the UV
TLDR
It is taken as an indication that the female grasshopper Ch.
To deal with the „Invisible”
  • E. Maier
  • Biology
    Naturwissenschaften
  • 1 October 1993
TLDR
This work investigated if remales of Leiothrix actually use UV patterns to discriminate between differently ,,UV-colored" males and found that females of this species could choose between males which differed in their UV reflection.