• Publications
  • Influence
Navigation-related structural change in the hippocampi of taxi drivers.
TLDR
Structural MRIs of the brains of humans with extensive navigation experience, licensed London taxi drivers, were analyzed and compared with those of control subjects who did not drive taxis, finding a capacity for local plastic change in the structure of the healthy adult human brain in response to environmental demands.
Patients with hippocampal amnesia cannot imagine new experiences
TLDR
It is revealed that patients with primary damage to the hippocampus bilaterally could construct new imagined experiences in response to short verbal cues that outlined a range of simple commonplace scenarios, but were markedly impaired relative to matched control subjects at imagining new experiences.
Deconstructing episodic memory with construction
Using Imagination to Understand the Neural Basis of Episodic Memory
TLDR
It is concluded that scene construction constitutes a common process underlying episodic memory and imagination of fictitious experiences, and may partially account for the similar brain networks implicated in navigation, episodic future thinking, and the default mode.
Knowing where and getting there: a human navigation network.
TLDR
A network of brain areas that support navigation in humans are outlined and the functions of these regions are linked to physiological observations in other mammals.
The retrosplenial contribution to human navigation: a review of lesion and neuroimaging findings.
  • E. Maguire
  • Psychology, Biology
    Scandinavian journal of psychology
  • 1 July 2001
TLDR
While there is strong evidence for right medial temporal lobe involvement in navigation, it now seems that the inputs the hippocampus and related structures receive from and convey to right retrosplenial cortex have a similar spatial preference, while the left medial temporal and left retrosPlenial cortices seem primarily concerned with more general aspects of episodic memory.
What does the retrosplenial cortex do?
TLDR
Advances on multiple fronts that have highlighted the importance of the retrosplenial cortex for cognition are reviewed, and why specifying its precise functions remains problematic are considered.
Neuroimaging studies of autobiographical event memory.
  • E. Maguire
  • Psychology, Biology
    Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society…
  • 29 September 2001
TLDR
The overall pattern across studies is of medial and left-lateralized activations associated with retrieval of autobiographical event memories, and it seems that the medial frontal cortex and left hippocampus in particular are responsive to such memories.
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