• Publications
  • Influence
A spreading-activation theory of semantic processing
TLDR
The present paper shows how the extended theory can account for results of several production experiments by Loftus, Juola and Atkinson's multiple-category experiment, Conrad's sentence-verification experiments, and several categorization experiments on the effect of semantic relatedness and typicality by Holyoak and Glass, Rips, Shoben, and Smith, and Rosch.
Planting misinformation in the human mind: a 30-year investigation of the malleability of memory.
  • E. Loftus
  • Psychology
    Learning & memory
  • 1 July 2005
TLDR
This review of the field ends with a brief discussion of the newer work involving misinformation that has explored the processes by which people come to believe falsely that they experienced rich complex events that never, in fact, occurred.
The reality of repressed memories.
  • E. Loftus
  • Psychology
    The American psychologist
  • 1993
TLDR
There has been a rise in reported memories of childhood sexual abuse that were allegedly repressed for many years, and people with recently unearthed memories are suing alleged perpetrators for events that happened 20, 30, even 40 or more years earlier.
Leading questions and the eyewitness report
  • E. Loftus
  • Psychology
    Cognitive Psychology
  • 1 October 1975
Semantic integration of verbal information into a visual memory.
TLDR
The results suggest that information to which a witness is exposed after an event, whether that information is consistent or misleading, is integrated into the witness's memory of the event.
The Formation of False Memories
For most of this century, experimental psychologists have been interested in how and why memory fails. As Greene2 has aptly noted, memories do not exist in a vacuum. Rather, they continually disrupt
Some facts about “weapon focus”
Abstract“Weapon focus” refers to the concentration of acrime witness's attention on a weapon, and the resultant reduction in ability to remember other details of the crime. We examined this
Imagination inflation: Imagining a childhood event inflates confidence that it occurred
TLDR
This experiment asks if imagining events from one’s past can affect memory for childhood events, drawing on the social psychology literature showing that imagining a future event increases the subjective likelihood that the event will occur.
The malleability of human memory.
  • E. Loftus
  • Psychology
    American scientist
  • 1 May 1979
TLDR
The literature of this phenomenon of new information about an experienced event may supplement and even alter the recollection of that event is reviewed and experiments which tried to determine under what circumstances misleading information will be incorporated in recollections are described.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...