• Publications
  • Influence
Comparative morphology of the eye in primates.
  • E. Kirk
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The anatomical record. Part A, Discoveries in…
  • 1 November 2004
TLDR
Comparisons between the two primate suborders demonstrate that haplorhines and strepsirrhines differ significantly in eye morphology, and it is revealed that diurnal anthropoids have smaller relative cornea sizes than most nonprimate mammals. Expand
Functional Implications of Ubiquitous Semicircular Canal Non-Orthogonality in Mammals
TLDR
It is concluded that the available comparative morphometric data do not support the canonical model and that its overemphasis as a heuristic generalization obscures a large amount of functionally relevant variation in semicircular canal orientation between species. Expand
Eye Morphology in Cathemeral Lemurids and Other Mammals
  • E. Kirk
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Folia Primatologica
  • 1 January 2006
TLDR
Results suggest that Eulemur species resemble other cathemeral mammals in having eyes that are adapted to function under variable environmental light levels, and suggest that cathemerality is a relatively ancient adaptation in Eulesmur that was present in the last common ancestor of the genus. Expand
Osteological evidence for the evolution of activity pattern and visual acuity in primates.
  • R. F. Kay, E. Kirk
  • Biology, Medicine
  • American journal of physical anthropology
  • 1 October 2000
TLDR
Measurements demonstrate that the omomyiforms Microchoerus, Necrolemur, Shoshonius, and Tetonius, adapiform Pronycticebus, and the possible lorisiform Plesiopithecus were likely nocturnal on the basis of orbit diameter. Expand
The Evolution of High Visual Acuity in the Anthropoidea
TLDR
While the tarsier visual system is primarily specialized for enhanced sensitivity in the context of nocturnal visual predation (Castenholz, 1984s), most living anthropoids are adapted for extremely acute diurnal vision. Expand
Intrinsic hand proportions of euarchontans and other mammals: implications for the locomotor behavior of plesiadapiforms.
TLDR
The analyses reveal that many arboreal mammals (including some tree shrews, rodents, marsupials, and carnivorans) have manual ray III proportions similar to those of variousArboreal primates, and these results support the hypothesis that Euarchonta originated in an arBoreal milieu. Expand
First cranial remains of a gondwanatherian mammal reveal remarkable mosaicism
TLDR
The first skull material of a gondwanatherian is reported, a complete and well-preserved cranium from Upper Cretaceous strata in Madagascar that is assigned to a new genus and species and is the largest known mammaliaform from the Mesozoic of Gondwana. Expand
Evolution of eye size and shape in primates.
  • C. Ross, E. Kirk
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of human evolution
  • 1 March 2007
TLDR
The analysis shows that primates differ from other mammals in having large eyes relative to body size and that anthropoids exhibit unusually small corneas, supporting the conclusion that the origin of anthropoids was associated with a change in eye shape to improve visual acuity in the context of a diurnal predatory habitus. Expand
Effects of activity pattern on eye size and orbital aperture size in primates.
  • E. Kirk
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of human evolution
  • 1 August 2006
TLDR
It is shown that despite clear differences in relative orbital aperture size, many diurnal and nocturnal primates do not differ in relative eye size, and existing scenarios for the evolution of unique orbital morphologies in anthropoids must be modified to reflect the importance of ecological variables other than activity pattern. Expand
Visual Acuity in Mammals: Effects of Eye Size and Ecology
TLDR
The data demonstrate that higher visual acuity in mammals is associated with: (1) diurnality and (2) predatory habits once the effects of eye size and phylogeny have been statistically controlled. Expand
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