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IV. A Description of the anatomy of the ornithorhynchus paradoxus
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The subjects from which the following description is taken, were sent from New South Wales, to Sir Joseph Banks, who very obligingly submitted them to my examination. These were two specimensExpand
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X. An account of the dissection of an hermaphrodite dog. To which are prefixed, some observations on hermaphrodites general
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Instances of animals being brought forth, whose organs of generation are preternaturally formed, sometimes occur, and have been commonly called hermaphrodites; this term, however, should be confinedExpand
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XXVIII. Some account of the fossil remains of an animal move nearly allied to fishes than any of the other classes of animals
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The study of comparative anatomy is not confined to the animals that at present inhabit the earth, but extends to the remains of such as existed in the most remote periods of antiquity; among theseExpand
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On the placenta
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III. Additional facts respecting the fossil remains of an animal, on the subject of which two papers have been printed in the Philosophical Transctions, showing that the bones of the sternum resemble
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My first account of the fossil bones of this most extraordinary animal attracted the notice of geologists, and collectors of extraneous fossils, and led Mr. Johnston of Bristol, and the Revd. Mr.Expand
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XXII. Some farther account of the fossil remains of an animal, of which a description was given to the Society in 1814
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For the materials of the former Paper I was indebted to Mr. Bullock, who has in his possession the skull, a great number of the vertebrae, many mutilated ribs, and other bones of this animal, in aExpand
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XIV. Reasons for giving the name Proteo-Saurus to the fossil skeleton which has been described
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In the three Papers which I laid before the Society upon the subject of this fossil skeleton, I never ventured to hazard a conjecture upon the place in the chain of created beings, to which theExpand
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