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Should females prefer dominant males?
Unusually dynamic sex roles in a fish
TLDR
This is the first time that a shift in sex roles has been shown in a vertebrate, and it might be explained by a large decline in male abundance, strongly skewing the sex ratio towards females.
Male mate choice selects for female coloration in a fish
TLDR
Examination of mate-choice experiments with two-spotted gobies provides experimental evidence that males prefer ornamented females in a fish that is not sex-role reversed, supporting the hypothesis that female ornamentation is sexually selected.
Female sand gobies prefer good fathers over dominant males
  • E. Forsgren
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London…
  • 22 September 1997
TLDR
Results from an experiment disentangling the effects of intra– and intersexual selection in the sand goby, Pomatoschistus minutus, a marine fish that exhibits paternal care show that large males are successful in male–male competition, but contrary to what one would expect, dominants are not preferred by females and are not better at taking care of the eggs.
Female sand gobies gain direct benefits by choosing males with eggs in their nests
TLDR
Female preference for males with eggs in their nests is adaptive, and can be explained by direct benefits, as more surviving offspring are produced.
MODE OF SEXUAL SELECTION DETERMINED BY RESOURCE ABUNDANCE IN TWO SAND GOBY POPULATIONS
TLDR
Nest‐site abundance can influence the relative contribution of intrasexual competition and mate choice in a population, and resource availability can contribute to within‐species variation in mating patterns.
Parental behaviour in relation to food availability in the common goby
TLDR
There was an association between how well the nest was built and partial clutch filial cannibalism, suggesting that the appearance of the nest may indicate the condition of the male, and thus the risk of filial Cannibalism.
Plastic sex-roles in the common goby – the effect of nest availability
TLDR
It is suggested that nest site availability affects mating competition and courtship roles in the common goby.
Predation Risk Affects Mate Choice in a Gobiid Fish
  • E. Forsgren
  • Biology
    The American Naturalist
  • 1 December 1992
TLDR
The aim of this study was to investigate whether females prefer certain males over others and whether mate choice is affected by predation risk in the sand goby.
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