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Francisella tularensis was identified as the cause of a die-off which occurred among a colony of semi-free-living common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). During the outbreak 5 out of 62 animals died of tularaemia in a research facility located in the district of Goettingen, Germany. All animals had been born at the facility suggesting an endemic infection. A(More)
Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, is a potential agent of bioterrorism. The phenotypic discrimination of closely related, but differently virulent, Francisella tularensis subspecies with phenotyping methods is difficult and time-consuming, often producing ambiguous results. As a fast and simple alternative, matrix-assisted laser(More)
Strain FhSp1T, isolated from human blood in Spain in 2003, was studied for its taxonomic allocation. By 16S rRNA and recA gene sequencing, the strain was shown to belong to the genus Francisella. In the 16S rRNA gene sequence, Francisella sp. FhSp1T shared similarity of more than 99% with strains of Francisella tularensis subspecies and Francisella novicida(More)
BACKGROUND Tularemia re-emerged in Germany starting in 2004 (with 39 human cases from 2004 to 2007) after over 40 years of only sporadic human infections. The reasons for this rise in case numbers are unknown as is the possible reservoir of the etiologic agent Francisella (F.) tularensis. No systematic study on the reservoir situation of F. tularensis has(More)
Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica isolates from Austria, Germany, Hungary, Italy, and Romania were placed into an existing phylogeographic framework. Isolates from Italy were assigned to phylogenetic group B.FTNF002-00; the other isolates, to group B.13. Most F. tularensis subsp. holarctica isolates from Europe belong to these 2 geographically(More)
In November 2005, an outbreak of tularemia occurred among 39 participants in a hare hunt in Hesse, Germany. Previously reported tularemia outbreaks in Germany dated back to the 1950s. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among participants and investigated the environment to identify risk factors for infection. Ten participants had serologic evidence(More)
Tularemia is a plague-like infection caused by Francisella (F.) tularensis classified as a biological warfare agent. F. tularensis subsp. tularensis is the most virulent subspecies demanding rapid diagnosis. Typing systems for this fastidious bacterium to the subspecies level are laborious and time consuming. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop(More)
An in-house immunochromatographic test, Plague BioThreat Alert test strips, ABICAP columns, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence microscopy were compared for the detection of the fraction 1 capsular antigen of Yersinia pestis, using spiked buffer and clinical specimens. Hand-held test kits proved to be excellent benchtop(More)
Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularaemia, is a potential agent of bioterrorism. The phenotypic discrimination of the closely related F. tularensis subspecies and individual strains with traditional methods is difficult and time consuming, often producing ambiguous results. Surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS(More)