E J Wagenmakers

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The counter model for perceptual identification (Ratcliff & McKoon, 1997) differs from alternative views of word recognition in two important ways. First, it assumes that prior study of a word does not result in increased sensitivity but, rather, in bias. Second, the effects of word frequency and prior study are explained by different mechanisms. In the(More)
The original version of the counter model for perceptual identification (Ratcliff & McKoon, 1997) assumed that word frequency and prior study act solely to bias the identification process (i.e., subjects have a tendency to prefer high-frequency and studied low-frequency words, irrespective of the presented word). In a recent study, using a two-alternative(More)
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