E. J. Kamsteeg

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Autosomal recessive and dominant nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a disease in which the kidney is unable to concentrate urine in response to vasopressin, are caused by mutations in the aquaporin-2 (AQP2) gene. Missense AQP2 proteins in recessive NDI have been shown to be retarded in the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas AQP2-E258K, an AQP2 mutant in(More)
Mutations in the aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channel gene cause autosomal recessive nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Here we report the first patient with an autosomal dominant form of NDI, which is caused by a G866A transition in the AQP2 gene of one allele, resulting in a E258K substitution in the C-tail of AQP2. To define the molecular cause of NDI in(More)
In renal principal cells, vasopressin regulates the shuttling of the aquaporin (AQP)2 water channel between intracellular vesicles and the apical plasma membrane. Vasopressin-induced phosphorylation of AQP2 at serine 256 (S256) by protein kinase A (PKA) is essential for its localization in the membrane. However, phosphorylated AQP2 (p-AQP2) has also been(More)
The Kidd (JK) blood group locus encodes a urea transporter that is expressed on human red cells and on endothelial cells of the vasa recta in the kidney. Here, we report the identification in human erythroblasts of a novel cDNA, designated HUT11A, which encodes a protein identical to the previously reported erythroid HUT11 urea transporter, except for a(More)
Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channel mutations cause autosomal recessive and dominant nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Expressed in oocytes, a mutant in dominant (AQP2-E258K), but not in recessive (AQP2-R187C), NDI conferred a specific dominant-negative effect (DNE) on wild-type (WT) AQP2 water permeability (P(f)) but only at low expression levels. Here, we(More)
Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is a disease characterized by the inability of the kidney to concentrate urine upon stimulation with vasopressin. Mutations in the gene for aquaporin-2 (AQP2) are the cause of the autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant forms of NDI. Mutant AQP2 proteins, found in autosomal recessive NDI, were shown to be misfolded(More)
The identification of the first water channel in 1991 opened up a new field in cell biology and physiology that significantly increased our understanding of mammalian water balance regulation. Since then, nine other mammalian aquaporins have been identified. Although the physiological significance of many aquaporins is still to be elucidated, it has been(More)
Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) missense mutants in recessive nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) are all retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but some could function as water channels. No conclusions could be drawn about the water permeability (P f) of others, because there was no method for quantifying AQP2 expression in the plasma membrane. We recently(More)
Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channel mutations cause autosomal recessive and dominant nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Expressed in oocytes, a mutant in dominant (AQP2-E258K), but not in recessive (AQP2-R187C), NDI conferred a specific dominant-negative effect on wild-type (wt) AQP2 water permeability (Pf) only at low expression levels. Since at these(More)