E. F. Kaasschieter

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The swelling and shrinkage of biological tissues are modelled by a four-component mixture theory in which a deformable and charged porous medium is saturated with a fluid with dissolved ions. Four components are defined: solid, liquid, cations and anions. The aim of this paper is the construction of the Lagrangian model of the four-component system. It is(More)
Cartilage exhibits a swelling and shrinking behaviour that influences the function of the cells inside the tissue. This behaviour is caused by mechanical, chemical and electrical loads. It is described by the electrochemomechanical mixture theory, in which the tissue is represented by four components: a charged porous solid, a fluid, cations and anions. By(More)
The swelling and shrinkage of biological tissues are modelled by a four-component mixture theory [J.M. Huyghe and J.D. Janssen, Int. J. Engng. Sci. 35 (1997) 793–802; K. Malakpoor, E.F. Kaasschieter and J.M. Huyghe, Mathematical modelling and numerical solution of swelling of cartilaginous tissues. Part I: Modeling of incompressible charged porous media.(More)
The swelling and shrinkage of biological tissues are modelled by a four-component mixture theory. This theory results in a coupled system of nonlinear parabolic differential equations together with an algebraic constraint for electroneutrality. In this model, it is desirable to obtain accurate approximations of the fluid flow and ions flow. Such accurate(More)
Moisture and salt transport in masonry can give rise to damages. Therefore a detailed knowledge of the moisture and salt transport is essential for understanding the durability of masonry. A special NMR apparatus has been made allowing quasi-simultaneous measurements of both moisture and Na profiles in porous building materials. Using this apparatus both(More)
Swelling and shrinking of cartilaginous tissues is modelled by a four-component mixture theory. This theory results in a set of coupled non-linear partial differential equations for the electrochemical potentials and the displacement. For the sake of local mass conservation these equations are discretised in space by a mixed finite element method.(More)
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