Dusica Vidovic

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T-helper cells that produce interleukin-17 (T(H)17 cells) are a recently identified CD4(+) T-cell subset with characterized pathological roles in autoimmune diseases. The nuclear receptors retinoic-acid-receptor-related orphan receptors α and γt (RORα and RORγt, respectively) have indispensible roles in the development of this cell type. Here we present(More)
PPARγ is the functioning receptor for the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of antidiabetes drugs including rosiglitazone and pioglitazone. These drugs are full classical agonists for this nuclear receptor, but recent data have shown that many PPARγ-based drugs have a separate biochemical activity, blocking the obesity-linked phosphorylation of PPARγ by Cdk5.(More)
We report here a class of thiazolidine-2,4-diones and 2-thioxothiazolidin-4-ones as potent inhibitors of the lymphoid specific tyrosine phosphatase (Lyp) identified from high throughput screens. Chemical modification by incorporating the known phosphotyrosine (pTyr) mimics led to the discovery of a salicylate-based inhibitor with submicromolar potency.
Some time ago a structure-descriptor, named "chirality code", was put forward [J. Chem. Inf. Comput. Sci. 2001, 41, 369-375], aimed at distinguishing between enantiomers. The chirality code is a sequence of (typically 100) numbers, being equal to the value of a certain "chirality function" at equidistant points within a chosen interval. For molecules of(More)
The lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase (Lyp, PTPN22) is a critical negative regulator of T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the ptpn22 gene correlates with the incidence of various autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Since the disease-associated(More)
Tyrosine phosphorylation, controlled by the coordinated action of protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), is a fundamental regulatory mechanism of numerous physiological processes. PTPs are implicated in a number of human diseases, and their potential as prospective drug targets is increasingly being recognized. Despite(More)
Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a novel target for the treatment of hypertension and vascular inflammation. A new class of potent non-urea sEH inhibitors was identified via high throughput screening (HTS) and chemical modification. IC(50)s of the most potent compounds range from micromolar to low nanomolar.
There is an urgent need to identify novel therapies for glioblastoma (GBM) as most therapies are ineffective. A first step in this process is to identify and validate targets for therapeutic intervention. Epigenetic modulators have emerged as attractive drug targets in several cancers including GBM. These epigenetic regulators affect gene expression without(More)
The National Institutes of Health Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) program is generating extensive multidimensional data sets, including biochemical, genome-wide transcriptional, and phenotypic cellular response signatures to a variety of small-molecule and genetic perturbations with the goal of creating a sustainable, widely(More)
The Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) project is a large-scale coordinated effort to build a comprehensive systems biology reference resource. The goals of the program include the generation of a very large multidimensional data matrix and informatics and computational tools to integrate, analyze, and make the data readily(More)