Dragan Djoric

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and Applied Analysis 3 effectively larger than that of the ordinary conemetric spaces. That is, every cone metric space is a cone b-metric space, but the converse need not be true. The following examples show the above remarks. Example 7. Let X = {−1, 0, 1}, E = R, andP = {(x, y) : x ≥ 0, y ≥ 0}. Define d : X × X → P by d(x, y) = d(y, x) for all x, y ∈ X,(More)
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