Douglas V. Dolfi

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Chronic infections strain the regenerative capacity of antiviral T lymphocyte populations, leading to failure in long-term immunity. The cellular and molecular events controlling this regenerative capacity, however, are unknown. We found that two distinct states of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells exist in chronically infected mice and humans. Differential(More)
The prevailing paradigm of T lymphocyte control of viral replication is that the protective capacity of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells is directly proportional to the number of functions they can perform, with IL-2 production capacity considered critical. Having recently defined rapid perforin upregulation as a novel effector function of antigen-specific(More)
Current yearly influenza virus vaccines induce strain-specific neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses providing protective immunity to closely matched viruses. However, these vaccines are often poorly effective in high-risk groups such as the elderly and challenges exist in predicting yearly or emerging pandemic influenza virus strains to include in the(More)
Introductory Paragraph CD8 + T cells in chronic viral infections like HIV develop functional defects such as loss of IL-2 secretion and decreased proliferative potential that are collectively termed exhaustion 1. Exhausted T cells express increased levels of multiple inhibitory receptors, such as Programmed Death 1 (PD-1) 2,3 that contribute to impaired(More)
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