Douglas J. Winton

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The rapid cell turnover of the intestinal epithelium is achieved from small numbers of stem cells located in the base of glandular crypts. These stem cells have been variously described as rapidly cycling or quiescent. A functional arrangement of stem cells that reconciles both of these behaviours has so far been difficult to obtain. Alternative(More)
According to the current model of adult epidermal homeostasis, skin tissue is maintained by two discrete populations of progenitor cells: self-renewing stem cells; and their progeny, known as transit amplifying cells, which differentiate after several rounds of cell division. By making use of inducible genetic labelling, we have tracked the fate of a(More)
With the capacity for rapid self-renewal and regeneration, the intestinal epithelium is stereotypical of stem cell-supported tissues. Yet the pattern of stem cell turnover remains in question. Applying analytical methods from population dynamics and statistical physics to an inducible genetic labeling system, we showed that clone size distributions conform(More)
Although Apc is well characterized as a tumor-suppressor gene in the intestine, the precise mechanism of this suppression remains to be defined. Using a novel inducible Ahcre transgenic line in conjunction with a loxP-flanked Apc allele we, show that loss of Apc acutely activates Wnt signaling through the nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin.(More)
BACKGROUND & AIMS A system for introducing specific gene mutations into the epithelia of the adult murine gastrointestinal tract by the transcriptional regulation of Cre recombinase is presented and applied to delete beta-catenin, a central mediator of Wnt signaling, within the small intestine (SI). METHODS In a transgenic line (Ahcre), cre expression is(More)
Somatically inducible Cre lines are used extensively to study gene function. However, a background level of spontaneous recombination due to unregulated expression of Cre is particularly confounding for cancer models in which following the pathogenesis of the disease requires the introduction of sporadic mutations that are monitored over time. In three(More)
Lineage-tracing approaches, widely used to characterize stem cell populations, rely on the specificity and stability of individual markers for accurate results. We present a method in which genetic labeling in the intestinal epithelium is acquired as a mutation-induced clonal mark during DNA replication. By determining the rate of mutation in vivo and(More)
Cancer is a disease in which cells accumulate genetic aberrations that are believed to confer a clonal advantage over cells in the surrounding tissue. However, the quantitative benefit of frequently occurring mutations during tumor development remains unknown. We quantified the competitive advantage of Apc loss, Kras activation, and P53 mutations in the(More)
The intestinal epithelium has a remarkable capacity to regenerate after injury and DNA damage. Here, we show that the integrin effector protein Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is dispensable for normal intestinal homeostasis and DNA damage signaling, but is essential for intestinal regeneration following DNA damage. Given Wnt/c-Myc signaling is activated(More)
A cellular marker for individual somatic cells and their clonal descendents would be a valuable tool for the investigation of cell lineages and clonal organization in developing and in renewing tissues. Such markers have been developed in Drosophila, but (apart from mutant melanocytes in retinal pigmented epithelium) not so far in mammalian tissues. We(More)