Douglas J Perkins

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We compared interleukin-12 (IL-12) and other cytokine activities during and after an acute clinical episode in a matched-pair case-control study of young African children who presented with either mild or severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The acute-phase, pretreatment plasma IL-12 and alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) levels, as well as the acute-phase(More)
Induction of proinflammatory cytokine responses by glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs) of in-traerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum is believed to contribute to malaria pathogenesis. In this study, we purified the GPIs of P. falciparum to homogeneity and determined their structures by biochemical degradations and mass spectrometry. The parasite GPIs differ(More)
Chemokines regulate the host immune response to a variety of infectious pathogens. Since the role of chemokines in regulating host immunity in children with Plasmodium falciparum malaria has not previously been reported, circulating levels of beta-chemokines (MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and RANTES) and their respective transcriptional profiles in ex vivo(More)
Experiments outlined here investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum-induced malarial anemia (MA). The results show that ex vivo and in vitro NO synthase (NOS) activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) is significantly elevated in children with MA and inversely associated with hemoglobin levels.(More)
Severe malarial anemia (MA) is the primary manifestation of severe malaria among children in areas of holoendemic Plasmodium falciparum transmission. Although overproduction of inflammatory-derived cytokines are implicated in the immunopathogenesis of severe MA, chemokines such as regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES, CCL5)(More)
Greater than 80% of malaria-related mortality occurs in sub-Saharan Africa due to infections with Plasmodium falciparum. The majority of P. falciparum-related mortality occurs in immune-naïve infants and young children, accounting for 18% of all deaths before five years of age. Clinical manifestations of severe falciparum malaria vary according to(More)
Severe malarial anemia (SMA), caused by Plasmodium falciparum infections, is one of the leading causes of childhood mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Although the molecular determinants of SMA are largely undefined, dysregulation in host-derived inflammatory mediators influences disease severity. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an important(More)
Although researchers have noted high level activation of rodent mononuclear phagocytes for nitric oxide (NO) synthase type 2 (S2) expression and NO production with a variety of agents such as interferon (IFN) ␥ and endotoxin, it has been difficult to demonstrate activation of human mononuclear phagocytes. The purpose of this study was to determine if IFN-␣(More)
BACKGROUND Assessment of malaria endemicity at different altitudes and transmission intensities, in the era of dwindling vector densities in the highlands, will provide valuable information for malaria control and surveillance. Measurement of serum anti-malarial antibodies is a useful marker of malaria exposure that indicates long-term transmission(More)
Mycobacterium abscessus has emerged as an important cause of lung infection, particularly in patients with bronchiectasis. Innate immune responses must be highly effective at preventing infection with M. abscessus because it is a ubiquitous environmental saprophyte and normal hosts are not commonly infected. M. abscessus exists as either a glycopeptidolipid(More)