Learn More
High levels of familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)-linked SOD1 mutants G93A and G37R were previously shown to mediate disease in mice through an acquired toxic property. We report here that even low levels of another mutant, G85R, cause motor neuron disease characterized by an extremely rapid clinical progression, without changes in SOD1 activity.(More)
The majority of early-onset cases of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) are linked to mutations in two related genes, PS1 and PS2, located on chromosome 14 and 1, respectively. Using two highly specific antibodies against nonoverlapping epitopes of the PS1-encoded polypeptide, termed presenilin 1 (PS1), we document that the preponderant PS1-related species(More)
Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause a subset of cases of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Four lines of mice accumulating one of these mutant proteins (G37R) develop severe, progressive motor neuron disease. At lower levels of mutant accumulation, pathology is restricted to lower motor neurons, whereas higher levels cause more severe(More)
Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited, neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a glutamine repeat in the N-terminus of the huntingtin protein. To gain insight into the pathogenesis of HD, we generated transgenic mice that express a cDNA encoding an N-terminal fragment (171 amino acids) of huntingtin with 82, 44 or 18 glutamines. Mice(More)
mRNAs encoding five genetically distinct muscarinic ACh receptors are present in the CNS. Because of their pharmacological similarities, it has not been possible to detect the individual encoded proteins; thus, their physiological functions are not well defined. To characterize the family of proteins, a panel of subtype-selective antibodies was generated(More)
Five or more dopamine receptor genes are expressed in brain. However, the pharmacological similarities of the encoded D1-D5 receptors have hindered studies of the localization and functions of the subtypes. To better understand the roles of the individual receptors, antibodies were raised against recombinant D1 and D2 proteins and were shown to bind to the(More)
The neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) act upon populations of neurons that express specific receptors. The present study demonstrates that BDNF rescues motor neurons from degeneration and may also play a role in the normal physiology of these cells. BDNF is expressed in the local(More)
In rat brain, the cellular localization of a phosphoinositide-linked metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1 alpha) was demonstrated using antibodies that recognize the C-terminus of the receptor. mGluR1 alpha, a 142 kd protein, is enriched within the olfactory bulb, stratum oriens of CA1 and polymorph layer of dentate gyrus in hippocampus, globus pallidus,(More)
The most common cause of dementia occurring in mid- to late-life is Alzheimer's disease (AD). Some cases of AD, particularly those of early onset, are familial and inherited as autosomal dominant disorders linked to the presence of mutant genes that encode the amyloid precursor protein (APP) or the presenilins (PS1 or PS2). These mutant gene products cause(More)