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Estimates of the worldwide incidence and mortality from 27 cancers in 2008 have been prepared for 182 countries as part of the GLOBOCAN series published by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. In this article, we present the results for 20 world regions, summarizing the global patterns for the eight most common cancers. Overall, an estimated(More)
Estimates of the worldwide incidence and mortality from 27 major cancers and for all cancers combined for 2012 are now available in the GLOBOCAN series of the International Agency for Research on Cancer. We review the sources and methods used in compiling the national cancer incidence and mortality estimates, and briefly describe the key results by cancer(More)
Cancer incidence and mortality estimates for 1995 are presented for the 38 countries in the four United Nations-defined areas of Europe, using World Health Organization mortality data and published estimates of incidence from national cancer registries. Additional estimation was required where national incidence data was not available, and the method(More)
Estimates of the worldwide incidence, mortality and prevalence of 26 cancers in the year 2002 are now available in the GLOBOCAN series of the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The results are presented here in summary form, including the geographic variation between 20 large "areas" of the world. Overall, there were 10.9 million new cases, 6.7(More)
Several infectious agents are considered to be causes of cancer in humans. The fraction of the different types of cancer, and of all cancers worldwide and in different regions, has been estimated using several methods; primarily by reviewing the evidence for the strength of the association (relative risk) and the prevalence of infection in different world(More)
Estimation of the burden of cancer in terms of incidence, mortality, and prevalence is a first step to appreciating appropriate control measures in a global context. The latest results of such an exercise, based on the most recent available international data, show that there were 10 million new cases, 6 million deaths, and 22 million people living with(More)
The annual incidence rates (crude and age-standardized) and numbers of new cases of 25 different cancers have been estimated for the year 1990 in 23 areas of the world. The total number of new cancer cases (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) was 8.1 million, just over half of which occur in the developing countries. The most common cancer in the world(More)
Knowledge of the incidence of cancer is a fundamental requirement of rational planning and monitoring of cancer control programs. The lack of national-level information systems on health indicators in China means that estimation methods are required. Estimates and projections of national level cancer mortality have been previously made using sample surveys(More)