Dirk Marcel Dhossche

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Antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) have been detected in the serum of patients with several neurological disorders. The presence of antibodies against GAD65 has not yet been examined in the serum of patients with neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this study, GAD65(More)
OBJECTIVE Catatonia is considered a unique syndrome of motor signs, at times life-threatening when aggravated by autonomic dysfunction and fever, but eminently treatable with specific medical treatments, if recognized early. Catatonia commonly occurs in children and adolescents with a wide range of associated disorders. The role of deprivation, abuse, or(More)
Our goal in this retrospective study was to assess empirical risk factors for repeat visits to the psychiatric emergency room. This information may be useful for targeted prevention and cost-effective service planning. Over a 7-month period, 400 (18%) of 2212 patients were repeat visitors, accounting for 36% of all visits. A diagnosis of a psychotic(More)
BACKGROUND Reports indicate that catatonia often occurs in autism. The association lacks a conceptual basis. Modern classificatory schemes define autism and catatonia separately and are not conducive to study areas of overlap. The exploration of the relation between autism and catatonia may be important because autism is increasingly recognized but(More)
MODERN PSYCHIATRIC NOSOLOGIES SEPARATE CATATONIA ALONG THE LINES OF PRESUMED ETIOLOGY: bipolar, major depression, schizophrenia, and/or due to a general medical condition. Catatonic signs have always possessed significant diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic value. Kahlbaum's description of this syndrome in his monograph "Katatonia" included careful(More)
Current autism research is historically separated from catatonia and other childhood psychotic disorders, although catatonia and autism share several common symptoms (mutism, echolalia, stereotypic speech and repetitive behaviors, posturing, grimacing, rigidity, mannerisms, and purposeless agitation). Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) effectively treats(More)
The usage of electroconvulsive therapy for the acute resolution of catatonia in autistic children and adults is a novel area that has received increased attention over the past few years. Reported length of the acute ECT course varies among these patients, and there is no current literature on maintenance ECT in autism. The maintenance ECT courses of three(More)
Multiple reports show the efficacious usage of ECT for catatonia in individuals with autism. There are also a few reports showing that ECT improves self-injury in people with and without autism. In this hypothesis, self-injury in autism and other developmental disorders may be an alternate sign of catatonia, and as such an indication for electroconvulsive(More)
OBJECTIVE Self-injurious behavior presents a significant challenge in autism, and first-line psychopharmacological and behavioral interventions have limited efficacy in some patients. These intractable cases may be responsive to electroconvulsive therapy. CLINICAL PICTURE This article presents an eight-year-old boy with autism, mental retardation,(More)