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This paper presents a system that supports the exploration of digital representations of large-scale museum ar-tifacts in through non-instrumented, location-based interaction. The system employs a state-of-the-art computer vision system, which localizes and tracks multiple visitors. The artifact is presented in a wall-sized projection screen and it is(More)
A frequent need of museums is to provide visitors with context-sensitive information about exhibits in the form of maps, or scale models. This paper suggests an augmented-reality approach for supplementing physical surfaces with digital information, through the use of pieces of plain paper that act as personal, location-aware, interactive screens. The(More)
We present the development of a multi-touch display based on computer vision techniques. The developed system is built upon low cost, off-the-shelf hardware components and a careful selection of computer vision techniques. The resulting system is capable of detecting and tracking several objects that may move freely on the surface of a wide projection(More)
This paper presents a computer vision system that supports non-instrumented, location-based interaction of multiple users with digital representations of large-scale artifacts. The proposed system is based on a camera network that observes multiple humans in front of a very large display. The acquired views are used to volumetrically reconstruct and track(More)
Augmented reality interactive exhibits in Cartographic Heritage: An implemented case-study open to the general public Summary: This paper presents the application of the PaperView system in the domain of cartographic heritage. PaperView is a multiuser augmented-reality system for supplementing physical surfaces with digital information, through the use of(More)
This paper describes the outcomes stemming from the work of a multidisciplinary R&D project of ICS-FORTH, aiming to explore and experiment with novel interactive museum exhibits, and to assess their utility, usability and potential impact. More specifically, four interactive systems are presented in this paper which have been integrated, tested and(More)
This paper presents the design and evaluation of "Game Over!", which is the world's first universally inaccessible game (i.e., a game that can be played by no one). The game is meant to be used as an educational tool for disseminating and teaching game accessibility guidelines. This is achieved by providing game developers a first-hand (frustrating)(More)