Dimitra Patroumpa

Learn More
—Collecting sensory data using a mobile data sink has been shown to drastically reduce energy consumption at the cost of increasing delivery delay. Towards improved energy-latency trade-offs, we propose a biased, adaptive sink mobility scheme, that adjusts to local network conditions, such as the surrounding density, remaining energy and the number of past(More)
Random walks in wireless sensor networks can serve as fully local, very simple strategies for sink motion that significantly reduce energy dissipation a lot but increase the latency of data collection. To achieve satisfactory energy-latency trade-offs the sink walks can be made adaptive, depending on network parameters such as density and/or history of past(More)
This work addresses networked embedded systems enabling the seamless interconnection of smart building automations to the Internet and their abstractions as web services. In our approach, such abstractions are used to primarily create a flexible, holistic and scalable system and allow external end-users to compose and run their own smart/green building(More)
Introduction Imagine a person moving in a smart environment with abundant heterogeneous wireless networking (such as WiFi, Blue-tooth, ZigBee and Cellular), carrying wearable, on-body or even implanted wireless devices (such as smart phones, medical equipment and tiny smart sensors). We call " radiation " at a target elementary surface (or area) the total(More)
Motivated by the problem of efficiently collecting data from wireless sensor networks via a mobile sink, we present an accelerated random walk on Random Geometric Graphs. Random walks in wireless sensor networks can serve as fully local, very simple strategies for sink motion that significantly reduce energy dissipation but introduce higher latency in the(More)
This research further investigates the recently introduced (in [4]) paradigm of radiation awareness in ambient environments with abundant heterogeneous wireless networking from a distributed computing perspective. We call radiation at a point of a wireless network the total amount of electromagnetic quantity the point is exposed to; our definition(More)
—We call radiation at a point of a wireless network the total amount of electromagnetic quantity (energy or power density) the point is exposed to. The impact of radiation can be high and we believe it is worth studying and control; towards radiation aware wireless networking we take (for the first time in the study of this aspect) a distributed computing,(More)
One of the most important applications of wireless sensor networks is building monitoring and more specifically, the early detection of emergency events and the provision of guidance for safe evacuation of the building. In this paper, we describe a demo application that, in the event of a fire inside a monitored building, uses the information from the(More)
  • 1