Learn More
Nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR) proteins oligomerize into multiprotein complexes termed inflammasomes when activated. Their autoinhibition mechanism remains poorly defined. Here, we report the crystal structure of mouse NLRC4 in a closed form. The adenosine diphosphate-mediated interaction between the central(More)
Protein acetylation emerged as a key regulatory mechanism for many cellular processes. We used genetic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify Esa1 as a histone acetyltransferase required for autophagy. We further identified the autophagy signaling component Atg3 as a substrate for Esa1. Specifically, acetylation of K19 and K48 of Atg3 regulated(More)
Nisin, a bacteriocin and commonly used food preservative, may serve as a novel potential therapeutic for treating head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), as it induces preferential apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and reduces cell proliferation in HNSCC cells, compared with primary keratinocytes. Nisin also reduces HNSCC tumorigenesis in vivo.(More)
Jumonji domain-containing 6 (JMJD6) is a member of the Jumonji C domain-containing family of proteins. Compared to other members of the family, the cellular activity of JMJD6 is still not clearly defined and its biological function is still largely unexplored. Here we report that JMJD6 is physically associated with the tumor suppressor p53. We demonstrated(More)
This work demonstrates that a comprehensive strategy of proteomics identification combined with further validation and detailed functional analysis should be adopted in the field of cancer biomarker discovery. A comparative proteomics approach was utilized to identify differentially expressed proteins in 10 oral squamous carcinoma samples paired with their(More)
The bark of Warburgia ugandensis (Canellaceae family) has been used as a medicinal source for a long history in many African countries. The presence of diverse terpenoids and abundant polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in this organ contributes to its broad range of pharmacological properties. Despite its medicinal and economic importance, the knowledge on(More)
Classical hormone receptors reversibly and non-covalently bind active hormone molecules, which are generated by biosynthetic enzymes, to trigger signal transduction. The α/β hydrolase DWARF14 (D14), which hydrolyses the plant branching hormone strigolactone and interacts with the F-box protein D3/MAX2, is probably involved in strigolactone detection.(More)