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  • S. D. McCarthy, Sinéad M Waters, +5 authors Dermot Morris
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Physiological genomics
  • 2010 (First Publication: 17 August 2010)
  • In high-yielding dairy cows the liver undergoes extensive physiological and biochemical changes during the early postpartum period in an effort to re-establish metabolic homeostasis and to counteractContinue Reading
  • Sasha A Hugentobler, Michael G. Diskin, +4 authors Dermot Morris
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Molecular reproduction and development
  • 2007 (First Publication: 1 April 2007)
  • Up to 40% of cattle embryos die within 3 weeks of fertilization while they are nutritionally dependent on the maternal environment provided by the oviduct and uterine fluids for their development andContinue Reading
  • David Anthony Kenny, Peter G Humpherson, +4 authors Joseph M. Sreenan
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Biology of reproduction
  • 2002 (First Publication: 1 June 2002)
  • Abstract High dietary protein leads to elevated systemic concentrations of ammonia and urea, and these, in turn, have been associated with reduced fertility in cattle. The effect of elevatingContinue Reading
  • Matthew Sean McCabe, Sinéad M Waters, Dermot Morris, David Anthony Kenny, David J. Lynn, Christopher J. Creevey
  • Biology, Medicine
  • BMC Genomics
  • 2011 (First Publication: 20 May 2012)
  • BackgroundThe liver is central to most economically important metabolic processes in cattle. However, the changes in expression of genes that drive these processes remain incompletely characterised.Continue Reading
  • Sasha A Hugentobler, Peter G Humpherson, Henry J. Leese, Joseph M. Sreenan, Dermot Morris
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Molecular reproduction and development
  • 2008 (First Publication: 1 March 2008)
  • Up to 40 percent of cattle embryos die within 3 weeks of fertilization but there is little or no published information on the composition of the oviduct and uterine fluids essential for theirContinue Reading