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It has been more than 10 years since it was first proposed that the neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) may be caused by deposition of amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) in plaques in brain tissue. According to the amyloid hypothesis, accumulation of Abeta in the brain is the primary influence driving AD pathogenesis. The rest of the disease process,(More)
Rapid progress in deciphering the biological mechanism of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has arisen from the application of molecular and cell biology to this complex disorder of the limbic and association cortices. In turn, new insights into fundamental aspects of protein biology have resulted from research on the disease. This beneficial interplay between basic(More)
Although extensive data support a central pathogenic role for amyloid beta protein (Abeta) in Alzheimer's disease, the amyloid hypothesis remains controversial, in part because a specific neurotoxic species of Abeta and the nature of its effects on synaptic function have not been defined in vivo. Here we report that natural oligomers of human Abeta are(More)
To determine whether the presenilin 1 (PS1), presenilin 2 (PS2) and amyloid beta-protein precursor (APP) mutations linked to familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) increase the extracellular concentration of amyloid beta-protein (A beta) ending at A beta 42(43) in vivo, we performed a blinded comparison of plasma A beta levels in carriers of these mutations and(More)
Accumulation of the amyloid-beta protein (Abeta) in the cerebral cortex is an early and invariant event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The final step in the generation of Abeta from the beta-amyloid precursor protein is an apparently intramembranous proteolysis by the elusive gamma-secretase(s). The most common cause of familial Alzheimer's(More)
The distinct protein aggregates that are found in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and prion diseases seem to cause these disorders. Small intermediates - soluble oligomers - in the aggregation process can confer synaptic dysfunction, whereas large, insoluble deposits might function as reservoirs of the bioactive oligomers. These emerging concepts are(More)
In its earliest clinical phase, Alzheimer's disease characteristically produces a remarkably pure impairment of memory. Mounting evidence suggests that this syndrome begins with subtle alterations of hippocampal synaptic efficacy prior to frank neuronal degeneration, and that the synaptic dysfunction is caused by diffusible oligomeric assemblies of the(More)
Alzheimer's disease constitutes a rising threat to public health. Despite extensive research in cellular and animal models, identifying the pathogenic agent present in the human brain and showing that it confers key features of Alzheimer's disease has not been achieved. We extracted soluble amyloid-beta protein (Abeta) oligomers directly from the cerebral(More)
Cells keep their energy balance and avoid oxidative stress by regulating mitochondrial movement, distribution, and clearance. We report here that two Parkinson's disease proteins, the Ser/Thr kinase PINK1 and ubiquitin ligase Parkin, participate in this regulation by arresting mitochondrial movement. PINK1 phosphorylates Miro, a component of the primary(More)
In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the impairment of declarative memory coincides with the accumulation of extracellular amyloid-beta protein (Abeta) and intraneuronal tau aggregates. Dementia severity correlates with decreased synapse density in hippocampus and cortex. Although numerous studies show that soluble Abeta oligomers inhibit hippocampal long-term(More)