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CONTEXT Current and future estimates of Alzheimer disease (AD) are essential for public health planning. OBJECTIVE To provide prevalence estimates of AD for the US population from 2000 through 2050. DESIGN Alzheimer disease incidence estimates from a population-based, biracial, urban study, using a stratified random sampling design, were converted to(More)
OBJECTIVES To provide updated estimates of Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia prevalence in the United States from 2010 through 2050. METHODS Probabilities of AD dementia incidence were calculated from a longitudinal, population-based study including substantial numbers of both black and white participants. Incidence probabilities for single year of age,(More)
CONTEXT Frequent participation in cognitively stimulating activities has been hypothesized to reduce risk of Alzheimer disease (AD), but prospective data regarding an association are lacking. OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that frequent participation in cognitive activities is associated with a reduced risk of AD. DESIGN Longitudinal cohort study with(More)
Clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease and other dementing illnesses were assessed in a geographically defined US community. Of 3623 persons (80.8% of all community residents over 65 years of age) who had brief memory testing in their homes, a stratified sample of 467 persons underwent neurological, neuropsychological, and laboratory examination.(More)
BACKGROUND Participation in cognitively stimulating activities is hypothesized to be associated with risk of AD, but knowledge about this association is limited. METHODS A biracial community in Chicago was censused, persons aged 65 years and older were asked to participate in an interview, and 6,158 of 7,826 (79%) eligible persons did so. As part of the(More)
Alzheimer disease will affect increasing numbers of people as baby boomers (persons born between 1946 and 1964) age. This work reports projections of the incidence of Alzheimer disease(AD) that will occur among older Americans in the future. Education adjusted age-specific incidence rates of clinically diagnosed probable AD were obtained from stratified(More)
Several methods of estimating prevalence of dementia are presented in this article. For both Brookmeyer and the Chicago Health and Aging project (CHAP), the estimates of prevalence are derived statistically, forward calculating from incidence and survival figures. The choice of incidence rates on which to build the estimates may be critical. Brookmeyer used(More)
Brief measurement devices can alleviate respondent burden and lower refusal rates in surveys. This article reports on a field test of two shorter forms of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) symptoms index in a multisite survey of persons 65 and older. Factor analyses demonstrate that the briefer forms tap the same symptoms dimensions(More)
OBJECTIVE To determine age-specific incidence rates of clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease. DESIGN Cohort, followed a mean of 4.3 years. SETTING East Boston, Mass. PARTICIPANTS Of 2313 persons aged 65 years and older who were initially free of Alzheimer's disease, 1601 participated in the ascertainment of incident disease (80% of survivors), 409(More)
Context: Current and future estimates of Alzheimer disease (AD) are essential for public health planning. Objective: To provide prevalence estimates of AD for the US population from 2000 through 2050. Design: Alzheimer disease incidence estimates from a population-based, biracial, urban study, using a stratified random sampling design, were converted to(More)