Deborah L. McGuinness

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This introduction presents the main motivations for the development of Description Logics (DL) as a formalism for representing knowledge, as well as some important basic notions underlying all systems that have been created in the DL tradition. In addition, we provide the reader with an overview of the entire book and some guidelines for reading it. We(More)
In recent years the development of ontologies—explicit formal specifications of the terms in the domain and relations among them (Gruber 1993)—has been moving from the realm of ArtificialIntelligence laboratories to the desktops of domain experts. Ontologies have become common on the World-Wide Web. The ontologies on the Web range from large taxonomies(More)
Service interface description languages such as WSDL, and related standards, are evolving rapidly to provide a foundation for interoperation between Web services. At the same time, Semantic Web service technologies, such as the Ontology Web Language for Services (OWL-S), are developing the means by which services can be given richer semantic specifications.(More)
CLASSIC is a data model that encourages the description of objects not only in terms of their relations to other known objects, but in terms of a level of intensional structure as well. The CLASSIC language of <italic>structured descriptions</italic> permits i) partial descriptions of individuals, under an 'open world' assumption, ii) answers to queries(More)
Current industry standards for describing Web Services focus on ensuring interoperability across diverse platforms, but do not provide a good foundation for automating the use of Web Services. Representational techniques being developed for the Semantic Web can be used to augment these standards. The resulting Web Service specifications enable the(More)
have investigated them. More recently, the notion of an ontology is becoming widespread in fields such as intelligent information integration, cooperative information systems, information retrieval, electronic commerce, and knowledge management. Ontologies are becoming popular largely because of what they promise: a shared and common understanding that(More)
Large-scale ontologies are becoming an essential component of many applications including standard search (such as Yahoo and Lycos), ecommerce (such as Amazon and eBay), configuration (such as Dell and PC-Order), and government intelligence (such as DARPA’s High Performance Knowledge Base (HPKB) program). The ontologies are becoming so large that it is not(More)
classic is a recently-developed knowledge representation system that follows the paradigm originally set out in the kl-one system: it concentrates on the de nition of structured concepts, their organization into taxonomies, the creation and manipulation of individual instances of such concepts, and the key inferences of subsumption and classi cation. Rather(More)
In Linked Data, the use of owl:sameAs is ubiquitous in interlinking data-sets. There is however, ongoing discussion about its use, and potential misuse, particularly with regards to interactions with inference. In fact, owl:sameAs can be viewed as encoding only one point on a scale of similarity, one that is often too strong for many of its current uses. We(More)
Ontologies have moved beyond the domains of library science, philosophy, and knowledge representation. They are now the concerns of marketing departments, CEOs, and mainstream business. Research analyst companies such as Forrester Research report on the critical roles of ontologies in support of browsing and search for e-commerce and in support of(More)