Deborah D. Crane

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Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the most common bacterial pathogens and is the etiological agent of debilitating sexually transmitted and ocular diseases in humans. The organism is an obligate intracellular prokaryote characterized by a highly specialized biphasic developmental cycle. We have performed genomic transcriptional analysis of the chlamydial(More)
Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular pathogens that can exhibit a broad host range in infection tropism despite maintaining near genomic identity. Here, we have investigated the molecular basis for this unique host-pathogen relationship. We show that human and murine chlamydial infection tropism is linked to unique host and pathogen genes that have(More)
Although the 16-kDa alpha-crystallin homologue of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is the dominant protein produced by stationary phase cultures in vitro, it is undetectable in logarithmically growing cultures. By growing bacilli at defined oxygen concentrations, acr transcription was shown to be strongly induced by mildly hypoxic conditions. Acr expression(More)
Chlamydia trachomatis possesses a cryptic 7.5-kb plasmid of unknown function. Here, we describe a comprehensive molecular and biological characterization of the naturally occurring plasmidless human C. trachomatis strain L2(25667R). We found that despite minimal chromosomal polymorphisms, the LGV strain L2(25667R) was indistinguishable from plasmid-positive(More)
Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular human bacterial pathogen that infects epithelial cells of the eye and genital tract. Infection can result in trachoma, the leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide, and sexually transmitted diseases. A common feature of infection is a chronic damaging inflammatory response for which the molecular(More)
Infections caused by the obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis have a marked impact on human health. C. trachomatis serovariants are the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted disease and infectious preventable blindness. Despite decades of effort, there is no practical vaccine against C. trachomatis diseases. Here we report that(More)
Summary The highly infectious bacterium Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen, whose virulence requires proliferation inside host cells, including macrophages. Here we have performed a global transcriptional profiling of the highly virulent F. tularensis ssp. tularensis Schu S4 strain during its intracellular cycle within primary(More)
Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligatory intracellular prokaryotic parasite that causes a spectrum of clinically important chronic inflammatory diseases of humans. Persistent infection may play a role in the pathophysiology of chlamydial disease. Here we describe the chlamydial transcriptome in an in vitro model of IFN-gamma-mediated persistence and(More)
Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligatory intracellular prokaryotic parasite that causes a spectrum of clinically important chronic inflammatory diseases of humans. Persistent infection may play a role in the pathophysiology of chlamydial disease. Here we describe the chlamydial transcriptome in an in vitro model of IFN-mediated persistence and reactivation(More)
Chlamydia trachomatis is the etiological agent of trachoma, the leading cause of preventable blindness. Trachoma presents distinct clinical syndromes ranging from mild and self-limiting to severe inflammatory disease. The underlying host and pathogen factors responsible for these diverse clinical outcomes are unclear. To assess the role played by pathogen(More)