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PURPOSE The efficacy of shock wave lithotripsy and percutaneous stone removal for the treatment of symptomatic lower pole renal calculi was determined. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective randomized, multicenter clinical trial was performed comparing shock wave lithotripsy and percutaneous stone removal for symptomatic lower pole only renal calculi 30 mm.(More)
PURPOSE The optimal management of lower pole renal calculi is controversial. We compared shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and ureteroscopy (URS) for the treatment of patients with small lower pole stones in a prospective, randomized, multicenter trial. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 78 patients with 1 cm or less isolated lower pole stones were randomized to(More)
PURPOSE The American Urological Association convened the Ureteral Stones Clinical Guidelines Panel to analyze the literature regarding available methods for treating ureteral calculi and to make practice policy recommendations based on the treatment outcomes data. MATERIALS AND METHODS The panel searched the MEDLINE data base for all articles related to(More)
PURPOSE To assess the current indications, perioperative morbidity, and stone-free outcomes for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) worldwide. PATIENTS AND METHODS The Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) collected prospective data for consecutive patients who were treated with PCNL at centers around the world for 1 year. PCNL(More)
PURPOSE The purpose of this guideline is to provide a clinical framework for the diagnosis, prevention and follow-up of adult patients with kidney stones based on the best available published literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS The primary source of evidence for this guideline was the systematic review conducted by the Agency for Healthcare Research and(More)
The American Urological Association Nephrolithiasis Clinical Guidelines Panel recommendations for managing struvite staghorn calculi are based on a comprehensive review of the treatment literature and meta-analysis of outcome data from the 110 pertinent articles containing viable, unduplicated data. The panel concluded that the 3 most significant outcome(More)
BACKGROUND The amount of oxalate excreted in urine has a significant impact on calcium oxalate supersaturation and stone formation. Dietary oxalate is believed to make only a minor (10 to 20%) contribution to the amount of oxalate excreted in urine, but the validity of the experimental observations that support this conclusion can be questioned. An(More)
The relationship of protein intake to urinary oxalate and glycolate excretion was examined in a large cohort (N = 101) of normal individuals on self-selected diets and in 11 individuals on controlled protein diets. On self-selected diets no correlation was detected between protein intake and urinary oxalate or glycolate excretion. A moderate but significant(More)