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Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a 38-amino acid C-terminally alpha-amidated peptide that was first isolated 20 years ago from an ovine hypothalamic extract on the basis of its ability to stimulate cAMP formation in anterior pituitary cells (Miyata et al., 1989. PACAP belongs to the vasoactive intestinal polypeptide(More)
Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a 38-amino acid peptide that was first isolated from ovine hypothalamic extracts on the basis of its ability to stimulate cAMP formation in anterior pituitary cells. PACAP belongs to the vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-glucagon-growth hormone releasing factor-secretin superfamily. The(More)
Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) has been originally isolated from the sheep hypothalamus on the basis of its ability to stimulate cAMP formation in anterior pituitary cells. Post-translational processing of the PACAP precursor generates two biologically active molecular forms, PACAP38 and PACAP27, and a novel peptide called(More)
A key issue in signal transduction is how signaling pathways common to many systems-so-called canonical signaling cassettes-integrate signals from molecules having a wide spectrum of activities, such as hormones and neurotrophins, to deliver distinct biological outcomes. The neuroendocrine cell line PC12, derived from rat pheochromocytoma, provides an(More)
Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) are members of a superfamily of structurally related peptide hormones that includes glucagon, glucagon-like peptides, secretin, gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP) and growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH). VIP and PACAP exert their actions through three GPCRs(More)
Oxidative stress, resulting from accumulation of reactive oxygen species, plays a critical role in neuronal cell death associated with neurodegenerative diseases and stroke. In the present study, we have investigated the potential neuroprotective effect of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) on oxidative stress-induced apoptosis.(More)
High concentrations of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its receptors have been detected in the rat cerebellum during ontogenesis. In particular, PACAP receptors are actively expressed in immature granule cells, suggesting that PACAP may act as a neurotrophic factor in the developing rat cerebellum. In the present study, we(More)
Alcohol exposure during development can cause brain malformations and neurobehavioral abnormalities. In view of the teratogenicity of ethanol, identification of molecules that could counteract the neurotoxic effects of alcohol deserves high priority. Here, we report that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) can prevent the deleterious(More)
Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a 38-amino acid peptide that was initially isolated from hypothalamus extracts on the basis of its ability to stimulate the production of cAMP in cultured pituitary cells. Recent studies have shown that PACAP exerts potent neuroprotective effects not only in vitro but also in in vivo models of(More)
We demonstrate in vitro expression of complement components, i.e. C3, factor H (FH), factor B (FB), C4, C1-inhibitor (C1-inh), C1q, C5, C6, C7 and C9, by four human neuroblastoma cell lines IMR32, SKNSH, SH-SY5Y and KELLY. Activating proteins C4, C9 and C1q, and regulatory proteins FH and C1-inh were produced constitutively by the four cell lines. C3, C6(More)