David Stuart Kessly

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The effect of sudden salinity increases on the kinetics of growth and carotenogenesis was studied in three geographically diverse isolates of Dunaliella saliva. A sudden increase in salinity results in a lag phase in growth and the length of this lag phase is dependent on the final salinity and the magnitude of the salinity change (no lag at 10–15% w/v(More)
Dunaliella tertiolecta (marine) and D. viridis (halophilic) were each trained by serial transfer to grow at salt concentrations previously regarded as the other's domain. D. viridis then had a salt optimum at 1.0-1.5 M sodium chloride whereas that for D. tertiolecta was less than 0-2 M. Nevertheless D. tertiolecta grew faster than the halophil at all salt(More)
Dunaliella tertiolecta (marine) and D. viridis (halophilic) were each trained by serial transfer to growth at salt concentrations previously regarded as the other's domain. D. viridis then had a salt optimum at 1.0–1.5 M sodium chloride whereas that for D. tertiolecta was less than 0–2 M. Nevertheless D. tertiolecta grew faster than the halophil at all salt(More)
Changes in glycerol content are reported for Dunaliella tertiolecta over an 8 h period after a salt stress or dilution stress. Under the experimental conditions, the new glycerol level was reached in about 30 min in light or dark but there was evidence of oscillations after that, particularly on dilution stress. Glycerol disappearance on dilution stress is(More)
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