David Maussang

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Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a widely spread herpesvirus, suggested to play a role in tumor progression. US28, a chemokine receptor encoded by HCMV, binds a broad spectrum of chemokines and constitutively activates various pathways linked to proliferation. Our studies reveal that expression of US28 induces a proangiogenic and transformed phenotype by(More)
G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and their peptidergic ligands are interesting therapeutic targets due to their involvement in various immune-related diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, HIV-1 infection and cancer. To tackle these diseases, a lot of effort has(More)
US28 is a viral G protein (heterotrimeric guanosine triphosphate-binding protein)-coupled receptor encoded by the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). In addition to binding and internalizing chemokines, US28 constitutively activates signaling pathways linked to cell proliferation. Here, we show increased concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor and(More)
The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), potentially associated with the development of malignancies, encodes the constitutively active chemokine receptor US28. Previously, we have shown that US28 expression induces an oncogenic phenotype both in vitro and in vivo. Microarray analysis revealed differential expression of genes involved in oncogenic signaling in(More)
BACKGROUND & AIMS Several lines of evidence support a role for Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling to protect the intestine from pathogenic infection. We hypothesized that TLR signaling at the level of the intestinal epithelium is critical for mucosal immune responses. METHODS We generated transgenic mice that express a constitutively active form of TLR4(More)
US28 is a constitutively active chemokine receptor encoded by CMV (also referred to as human herpesvirus 5), a highly prevalent human virus that infects a broad spectrum of cells, including intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). To study the role of US28 in vivo, we created transgenic mice (VS28 mice) in which US28 expression was targeted to IECs. Expression(More)
The important family of G protein-coupled receptors has so far not been targeted very successfully with conventional monoclonal antibodies. Here we report the isolation and characterization of functional VHH-based immunoglobulin single variable domains (or nanobodies) against the chemokine receptor CXCR4. Two highly selective monovalent nanobodies, 238D2(More)
The chemokine receptor CXCR7, belonging to the membrane-bound G protein-coupled receptor superfamily, is expressed in several tumor types. Inhibition of CXCR7 with either small molecules or small interference (si)RNA has shown promising therapeutic benefits in several tumor models. With the increased interest and effectiveness of biologicals inhibiting(More)
Brain cancer is a devastating disease affecting many people worldwide. Effective treatment with chemotherapeutics is limited due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that tightly regulates the diffusion of endogenous molecules but also xenobiotics. Glutathione pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (2B3-101) is being developed as a new treatment option(More)
The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is a critical regulator of cell migration and serves as a coreceptor for HIV-1. The chemokine stromal cell derived factor-1, also known as CXCL12, binds to CXCR4 and exerts its biologic functions partly through the small guanosine triphosphate hydrolase (GTPase) Rac1 (ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1). We show in(More)