David M. Stern

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Amyloid-beta peptide is central to the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, because it is neurotoxic--directly by inducing oxidant stress, and indirectly by activating microglia. A specific cell-surface acceptor site that could focus its effects on target cells has been postulated but not identified. Here we present evidence that the 'receptor for advanced(More)
Amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) interacts with the vasculature to influence Abeta levels in the brain and cerebral blood flow, providing a means of amplifying the Abeta-induced cellular stress underlying neuronal dysfunction and dementia. Systemic Abeta infusion and studies in genetically manipulated mice show that Abeta interaction with receptor for advanced(More)
S100/calgranulin polypeptides are present at sites of inflammation, likely released by inflammatory cells targeted to such loci by a range of environmental cues. We report here that receptor for AGE (RAGE) is a central cell surface receptor for EN-RAGE (extracellular newly identified RAGE-binding protein) and related members of the S100/calgranulin(More)
Advanced glycosylation end products of proteins (AGEs) are nonenzymatically glycosylated proteins which accumulate in vascular tissue in aging and at an accelerated rate in diabetes. A approximately 35-kDa polypeptide with a unique NH2-terminal sequence has been isolated from bovine lung and found to be present on the surface of endothelial cells where it(More)
Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), S100/calgranulins, HMGB1-proteins, amyloid-β peptides, and the family of β-sheet fibrils have been shown to contribute to a number of chronic diseases such as diabetes, amyloidoses, inflammatory conditions, and tumors by promoting cellular dysfunction via binding to cellular surface receptors. The receptor for AGEs(More)
The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a multi-ligand member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell surface molecules, interacts with distinct molecules implicated in homeostasis, development and inflammation, and certain diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer's disease. Engagement of RAGE by a ligand triggers activation of key cell(More)
Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of beta-amyloid (Abeta)-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we demonstrate that Abeta-binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) is a direct molecular link from Abeta to mitochondrial toxicity. Abeta interacts with ABAD in the mitochondria of AD patients and transgenic mice. The crystal structure of(More)
The multiligand receptors that form the focus of this Perspective series have expectedly diverse functions, often conforming to potential gaps in the host response to invading pathogens that are not effectively manned by adaptive immunity. For example, the macrophage scavenger receptor (type A) interacts with bacterial cell walls and enhances clearance of(More)
A fundamental goal of genetics and functional genomics is to identify and mutate every gene in model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster. The Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project (BDGP) gene disruption project generates single P-element insertion strains that each mutate unique genomic open reading frames. Such strains strongly facilitate further(More)