David Liénard

Learn More
Plant represented the essence of pharmacopoeia until the beginning of the 19th century when plant-derived pharmaceuticals were partly supplanted by drugs produced by the industrial methods of chemical synthesis. In the last decades, genetic engineering has offered an alternative to chemical synthesis, using bacteria, yeasts and animal cells as factories for(More)
Plant organs such as leaves or petals move as a result of changes in the shape and/or the volume of motor cells. In a similar manner, stomates open and close when the turgor in the guard cells changes. The time scale of such movements ranges from several milliseconds to hours. The most detailed studies of cellular movement have been done with stomata.(More)
The replacement of crude allergen extracts by selected allergens currently represents a major goal for the improvement of allergy diagnosis and immunotherapy. Indeed, the development of molecularly defined vaccines would facilitate both standardization and enhance batch-to-batch reproducibility as well as treatment specificity. In this study, we have(More)
Plants have emerged in the past decade as a suitable alternative to the current production systems for recombinant pharmaceutical proteins and, today their potential for low-cost production of high quality, much safer and biologically active mammalian proteins is largely documented. Among various plant expression systems being explored, genetically modified(More)
Plants were the main source for human drugs until the beginning of the nineteenth century when plant-derived pharmaceuticals were partly supplanted by drugs produced by the industrial methods of chemical synthesis. During the last decades of the twentieth century, genetic engineering has offered an alternative to chemical synthesis, using bacteria, yeasts(More)
Although aquaporins (AQPs) have been shown to increase membrane water permeability in many cell types, the physiological role of this increase was not always obvious. In this report, we provide evidence that in the leafy stage of development (gametophore) of the moss Physcomitrella patens, AQPs help to replenish more rapidly the cell water that is lost by(More)
The moss Physcomitrella patens is a long-standing model for studying plant development, growth and cell differentiation in particular. Interest in this non-vascular plant arose following the discovery that homologous recombination is an efficient process. P. patens is, therefore, a tool of choice not only to study gene function but also for recombinant(More)
  • 1