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Sediments from a high-level nuclear waste plume were collected as part of investigations to evaluate the potential fate and migration of contaminants in the subsurface. The plume originated from a leak that occurred in 1962 from a waste tank consisting of high concentrations of alkali, nitrate, aluminate, Cr(VI), (137)Cs, and (99)Tc. Investigations were(More)
The 4 payload crew members of the Spacelab Life Sciences 9-day space flight in 1991 were subjected to limited vestibular testing in flight as well as pre and post flight. Major differences in individual "perceptual style" appeared in their reaction to the visual-vestibular stimuli in the rotating dome experiment, and especially in the extent to which(More)
Previous studies have demonstrated that metal-reducing microorganisms can effectively promote the precipitation and removal of uranium from contaminated groundwater. Microbial communities were stimulated in the acidic subsurface by pH neutralization and addition of an electron donor to wells. In single-well push-pull tests at a number of treated sites,(More)
Iron(III)-reducing bacteria have been demonstrated to rapidly catalyze the reduction and immobilization of uranium(VI) from contaminated subsurface sediments. Thus, these organisms may aid in the development of bioremediation strategies for uranium contamination, which is prevalent in acidic subsurface sediments at U.S. government facilities.(More)
An obligately aerobic chemoheterotrophic bacterium (strain F199) previously isolated from Southeast Coastal Plain subsurface sediments and shown to degrade toluene, naphthalene, and other aromatic compounds (J. K. Fredrickson, F. J. Brockman, D. J. Workman, S. W. Li, and T. O. Stevens, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:796-803, 1991) was characterized by(More)
Heavy metal resistance by bacteria is a topic of much importance to the bioremediation of contaminated soils and sediments. We report here the isolation of a highly cadmium-resistant Klebsiella planticola strain, Cd-1, from reducing salt marsh sediments. The strain grows in up to 15 mM CdCl(2) under a wide range of NaCl concentrations and at acidic or(More)
The first complete three-dimensional ultrastructural reconstruction of a cyanobacterium was accomplished with high-voltage electron microscopy and computer-aided assembly of serial sections. The precise arrangement of subcellular features within the cell body was very consistent from one cell to another. Specialized inclusion bodies always occupied specific(More)
The first complete three-dimensional ultrastructural reconstruction of a cyanobac-terium was accomplished with high-voltage electron microscopy and computer-aided assembly of serial sections. The precise arrangement of subcellular features within the cell body was very consistent from one cell to another. Specialized inclusion bodies always occupied(More)
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