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A hybrid blocked and event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study decomposed brain activity during task switching into sustained and transient components. Contrasting task-switching blocks against single-task blocks revealed sustained activation in right anterior prefrontal cortex (PFC). Contrasting task-switch trials against task-repeat(More)
The parietal lobe has long been viewed as a collection of architectonic and functional subdivisions. Though much parietal research has focused on mechanisms of visuospatial attention and control-related processes, more recent functional neuroimaging studies of memory retrieval have reported greater activity in left lateral parietal cortex (LLPC) when items(More)
In recognition memory research, a tension exists between dual-process and single-process models of episodic retrieval. Dual-process models propose that 'familiarity' assessment and the 'recollection' of contextual information are independent processes, while single-process models claim that one common process supports retrieval. Event-related potentials(More)
Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies using mixed blocked/event-related designs have shown activity consistent with separable sustained task-related processes and transient trial-related processes. In the mixed design, control blocks are intermixed with task blocks, during which trials are presented at varying intervals. Two studies(More)
Decision making can be conceptualized as the culmination of an integrative process in which evidence supporting different response options accumulates gradually over time. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate brain activity leading up to and during decisions about perceptual object identity. Pictures were revealed gradually and(More)
Episodic memory depends upon multiple dissociable retrieval processes. Here we investigated the degree to which the processes engaged during successful retrieval are dependent on the properties of the representations that underlie memory for an event. Specifically we examined whether the individual elements of an event can, under some conditions, be(More)
Event-related fMRI studies reveal that episodic memory retrieval modulates lateral and medial parietal cortices, dorsal middle frontal gyrus (MFG), and anterior PFC. These regions respond more for recognized old than correctly rejected new words, suggesting a neural correlate of retrieval success. Despite significant efforts examining retrieval success(More)
Activity in the left inferior prefrontal cortex (LIPC) is often thought to reflect processes that support episodic encoding. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to test whether processes subserved by LIPC could be negatively related to subsequent memory performance. Specifically, the current experiment explicitly tested the hypothesis that(More)
It has been suggested that the mammalian memory system has both familiarity and recollection components. Recently, a high-capacity network to store familiarity has been proposed. Here we derive analytically the optimal learning rule for such a familiarity memory using a signal- to-noise ratio analysis. We find that in the limit of large networks the(More)
Episodic memory is supported by recollection, the conscious retrieval of contextual information associated with the encoding of a stimulus. Event-Related Potential (ERP) studies of episodic memory have identified a robust neural correlate of recollection--the left parietal old/new effect--that has been widely observed during recognition memory tests. This(More)