David H. Gutmann

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Dominant mutations in superoxide dismutase cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by the loss of motor neurons. Using mice carrying a deletable mutant gene, diminished mutant expression in astrocytes did not affect onset, but delayed microglial activation and sharply slowed later disease(More)
OBJECTIVE Neurofibromatosis 1 and neurofibromatosis 2 are autosomal dominant genetic disorders in which affected individuals develop both benign and malignant tumors at an increased frequency. Since the original National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference in 1987, there has been significant progress toward a more complete understanding of(More)
Medulloblastoma encompasses a collection of clinically and molecularly diverse tumour subtypes that together comprise the most common malignant childhood brain tumour. These tumours are thought to arise within the cerebellum, with approximately 25% originating from granule neuron precursor cells (GNPCs) after aberrant activation of the Sonic Hedgehog(More)
OBJECTIVE Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) represents one of the most common genetic causes of epilepsy. TSC gene inactivation leads to hyperactivation of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway, raising the intriguing possibility that mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors might be effective in preventing or treating epilepsy in patients with(More)
Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant condition with a worldwide incidence of approximately 1 per 2500 to 3000 individuals. Caused by a germ-line-inactivating mutation in the NF1 gene on chromosome 17, the disease is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. In the past several years, significant progress has been made in(More)
We uncovered a role for ERK signaling in GABA release, long-term potentiation (LTP), and learning, and show that disruption of this mechanism accounts for the learning deficits in a mouse model for learning disabilities in neurofibromatosis type I (NF1). Our results demonstrate that neurofibromin modulates ERK/synapsin I-dependent GABA release, which in(More)
Therapy development for adult diffuse glioma is hindered by incomplete knowledge of somatic glioma driving alterations and suboptimal disease classification. We defined the complete set of genes associated with 1,122 diffuse grade II-III-IV gliomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas and used molecular profiles to improve disease classification, identify molecular(More)
Optic pathway glioma (OPG), seen in 15% to 20% of individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), account for significant morbidity in young children with NF1. Overwhelmingly a tumor of children younger than 7 years, OPG may present in individuals with NF1 at any age. Although many OPG may remain indolent and never cause signs or symptoms, others lead to(More)
Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant tumor predisposition syndrome in which affected individuals have a greatly increased risk of developing malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). These cancers are difficult to detect and have a poor prognosis. Because patients may present to specialists from widely differing disciplines, the(More)
Members of the Protein 4.1 superfamily have highly conserved FERM domains that link cell surface glycoproteins to the actin cytoskeleton. Within this large and constantly expanding superfamily, at least five subgroups have been proposed. Two of these subgroups, the ERM and prototypic Protein 4.1 molecules, include proteins that function as tumor(More)