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This paper describes the design and performance of an image capture simulator. The general model underlying the simulator assumes that the image capture device contains multiple classes of sensors with different spectral sensitivities and that each sensor responds in a known way to irradiance over most of its operating range. The input to the simulator is a(More)
BACKGROUND RPE65 is an essential molecule in the retinoid-visual cycle, and RPE65 gene mutations cause the congenital human blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Somatic gene therapy delivered to the retina of blind dogs with an RPE65 mutation dramatically restores retinal physiology and has sparked international interest in human treatment(More)
Color vision supports two distinct visual functions: discrimination and constancy. Discrimination requires that the visual response to distinct objects within a scene be different. Constancy requires that the visual response to any object be the same across scenes. Across changes in scene, adaptation can improve discrimination by optimizing the use of the(More)
In the human, cone photoreceptors (L, M, and S) and the melanopsin-containing, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are active at daytime light intensities. Signals from cones are combined both additively and in opposition to create the perception of overall light and color. Similar mechanisms seem to be at work in the control of the(More)
Vision algorithms are often developed in a Bayesian framework. Two estimators are commonly used: maximum a posteriori (MAP), and minimum mean squared error (MMSE). We argue that neither is appropriate for perception problems. The MAP estima-tor makes insucient use of structure in the posterior probability. The squared error penalty of the MMSE estimator(More)
This paper describes the performance of an image capture simulator. The general model underlying the simulator assumes that a) the image capture device contains multiple classes of sensors with different spectral sensitivities and b) that each sensor responds linearly to light intensity over most of its operating range. We place no restrictions on the(More)
What determines the color appearance of real objects viewed under natural conditions? The light reflected from different locations on a single object can vary enormously. This variation is enhanced when the material properties of the object are changed from matte to glossy. Yet humans have no trouble assigning a color name to most things. We studied how(More)