Learn More
This paper presents a method for extracting distinctive invariant features from images that can be used to perform reliable matching between different views of an object or scene. The features are invariant to image scale and rotation, and are shown to provide robust matching across a substantial range of affine distortion, change in 3D viewpoint, addition(More)
For many computer vision problems, the most time consuming component consists of nearest neighbor matching in high-dimensional spaces. There are no known exact algorithms for solving these high-dimensional problems that are faster than linear search. Approximate algorithms are known to provide large speedups with only minor loss in accuracy, but many such(More)
The problem considered in this paper is the fully automatic construction of panoramas. Fundamentally, this problem requires recognition, as we need to know which parts of the panorama join up. Previous approaches have used human input or restrictions on the image sequence for the matching step. In this work we use object recognition techniques based on(More)
The problem of tracking a varying number of non-rigid objects has two major difficulties. First, the observation models and target distributions can be highly non-linear and non-Gaussian. Second, the presence of a large, varying number of objects creates complex interactions with overlap and ambiguities. To surmount these difficulties, we introduce a vision(More)
Shape indexing is a way of making rapid associations between features detected in an image and object models that could have produced them. When model databases are large, the use of high-dimensional features is critical, due to the improved level of discrimination they can provide. Unfortunately, finding the nearest neighbour to a query point rapidly(More)
We apply a biologically inspired model of visual object recognition to the multiclass object categorization problem. Our model modifies that of Serre, Wolf, and Poggio. As in that work, we first apply Gabor filters at all positions and scales; feature complexity and position/scale invariance are then built up by alternating template matching and max pooling(More)
We investigate the role of sparsity and localized features in a biologically-inspired model of visual object classification. As in the model of Serre, Wolf, and Poggio, we first apply Gabor filters at all positions and scales; feature complexity and position/scale invariance are then built up by alternating template matching and max pooling operations. We(More)
This paper approaches the problem of finding correspondences between images in which there are large changes in viewpoint, scale and illumination. Recent work has shown that scale-space ‘interest points’ may be found with good repeatability in spite of such changes. Furthermore, the high entropy of the surrounding image regions means that local descriptors(More)