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From 1918 to 1920, the police department of New Haven, Connecticut, operated a maintenance clinic for morphine addicts. The clinic registered 91 patrons by September 1920, when the facility was closed because of a change in federal narcotics-regulation policies. Death certificates recovered for 40 of the 91 registrants (44 per cent) show that the patrons(More)
Over the past 200 years, Americans have twice accepted and then vehemently rejected drugs. Understanding these dramatic historical swings provides perspective on our current reaction to drug use DAVID F. MUSTO is professor of psychiatry at the Child Study Center and professor of the history of medicine at Yale University. He earned his medical degree at the(More)
Through history, quarantine has been a response not only to the mode of disease transmission, but also to popular demands for a boundary between the kind of people so diseased and the respectable people who hope to remain healthy. Efforts to control epidemics--leprosy, cholera, tuberculosis, drug addiction--through quarantine of large numbers of people have(More)
The history of cocaine in America can be traced to the late 19th century. After the discovery of its physiological and psychological effects, cocaine figured in consumables as diverse as hay fever remedies, local anaesthetics and soft drinks. The development of its different usages as well as eventual control of its use through restrictive legislation(More)