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In this article we discuss re-retrieving personal information objects and relate the task to recovering from lapse(s) in memory. We propose that fundamentally it is lapses in memory that impede users from successfully re-finding the information they need. Our hypothesis is that by learning more about memory lapses in non-computing contexts and how people(More)
Human memory plays an important role in personal information management (PIM). Several scholars have noted that people refind information based on what they remember and it has been shown that people adapt their management strategies to compensate for the limitations of memory. Nevertheless, little is known about what people tend to remember about their(More)
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine how different aspects of an assessor's context, in particular their knowledge of a search topic, their interest in the search topic and their confidence in assessing relevance for a topic, affect the relevance judgements made and the assessor's ability to predict which documents they will assess as being(More)
Re-finding information that has been seen or accessed before is a task which can be relatively straightforward , but often it can be extremely challenging, time-consuming and frustrating. Little is known, however, about what makes one re-finding task harder or easier than another. We performed a user study to learn about the contextual factors that(More)
In this paper we present a longitudinal, naturalistic study of email behavior (n=47) and describe our efforts at isolating re-finding behavior in the logs through various qualitative and quantitative analyses. The presented work underlines the methodological challenges faced with this kind of research, but demonstrates that it is possible to isolate(More)
1 Motivation The motivation behind the University of Strathclyde's approach to this years HARD track was inspired from previous experiences by other participants, in particular research by [1], [3] and [4]. A running theme throughout these papers was the underlying hypothesis that a user's familiarity in a topic (i.e. their previous experience searching a(More)
In this paper, we provide novel research on information behaviour and information needs in the context of television viewing. We conducted a diary study of a heterogeneous population (n=38), in the non-work related activity of watching television, and we received 381 responses. From the collected responses, we used a bottom-up approach to generate coding(More)
Micro-blogging services such as Twitter represent constantly evolving, user-generated sources of information. Previous studies show that users search over such content regularly, but are often dissatisfied with current search facilities. We argue that an enhanced understanding of the motivations for search would aid the design of improved search systems,(More)