David E Thaler

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OBJECTIVE We aimed to create an index to stratify cryptogenic stroke (CS) patients with patent foramen ovale (PFO) by their likelihood that the stroke was related to their PFO. METHODS Using data from 12 component studies, we used generalized linear mixed models to predict the presence of PFO among patients with CS, and derive a simple index to stratify(More)
BACKGROUND Despite the diffusion into practice of percutaneous closure of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) in patients with cryptogenic stroke (CS), the benefits have not been demonstrated, and remain unclear. For any individual presenting with a PFO in the setting of CS, it is not clear whether the PFO is pathogenically-related to the index event or an(More)
OBJECTIVE To examine predictors of stroke recurrence in patients with a high vs a low likelihood of having an incidental patent foramen ovale (PFO) as defined by the Risk of Paradoxical Embolism (RoPE) score. METHODS Patients in the RoPE database with cryptogenic stroke (CS) and PFO were classified as having a probable PFO-related stroke (RoPE score of(More)
PURPOSE OF REVIEW The cause of stroke remains unknown in roughly one third of patients, despite extensive investigation. The prevalence of patent foramena ovale (PFOs) in the general population is around 25%, but it is doubled in cryptogenic stroke patients. This suggests a causal relationship between PFO and cryptogenic stroke. This has generally been(More)
This document and trademark(s) contained herein are protected by law. This representation of RAND intellectual property is provided for noncommercial use only. Unauthorized posting of this publication online is prohibited. Permission is given to duplicate this document for personal use only, as long as it is unaltered and complete. Permission is required(More)
OBJECTIVE We examined the influence of clinical, radiologic, and echocardiographic characteristics on antithrombotic choice in patients with cryptogenic stroke (CS) and patent foramen ovale (PFO), hypothesizing that features suggestive of paradoxical embolism might lead to greater use of anticoagulation. METHODS The Risk of Paradoxical Embolism Study(More)
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Dissection of the cervicocranial vessels is the principal cause of ischemic brain injury following cervical spinal manipulation. Cervical spinal manipulation leading to cerebral embolus in the absence of dissection is not described in the literature. Current case documents cerebral embolism originating from extensively calcified(More)
BACKGROUND For patients and health care providers who are considering spinal manipulative therapy of the neck, it is crucial to establish if it is a trigger for cervical artery dissection and/or stroke, and if it is, the magnitude of the risk. DISCUSSION We discuss the biological plausibility of how neck manipulation could cause cervical artery(More)
This document and trademark(s) contained herein are protected by law. This representation of RAND intellectual property is provided for noncommercial use only. Unauthorized posting of this publication online is prohibited. Permission is given to duplicate this document for personal use only, as long as it is unaltered and complete. Permission is required(More)