David B. Campbell

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Tottering (tg) is an autosomal recessive mutation of the calcium channel alpha1A subunit in the mouse that results in epileptic spike and wave discharges, mild ataxia and paroxysmal episodes of involuntary spasms of the limbs, trunk and face. These convulsions have been especially difficult to characterize because of their unpredictable occurrence and lack(More)
Tottering mice inherit a recessive mutation of the calcium channel alpha1A subunit that causes ataxia, polyspike discharges, and intermittent dystonic episodes. The calcium channel alpha1A subunit gene encodes the pore-forming protein of P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channels and is predominantly expressed in cerebellar granule and Purkinje neurons(More)
Tottering (tg) mice inherit a recessive mutation of the calcium channel alpha 1A subunit gene, which encodes the pore-forming protein of P/Q-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels and is predominantly expressed in cerebellar granule and Purkinje neurons. The phenotypic consequences of the tottering mutation include ataxia, polyspike discharges, and an(More)
We have refined the map positions and identified molecular markers for three neurological mutations in the mouse, tottering (tg), Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd), and nervous (nr). These mutations were localized using simple sequence length polymorphisms between the mouse strain on which the mutation arose and the inbred strain onto which the mutation was(More)
H-cadherin is a newly characterized cadherin molecule whose expression is decreased in a variety of human carcinoma cells, suggesting that it may play a role in maintaining normal cellular phenotype. To investigate how re-expression of H-cadherin could influence the malignant phenotype of human breast carcinoma cells in vivo, we transfected both control and(More)
Spontaneous neurologic mutations in the mouse provide powerful tools for the study of mammalian central nervous system development. The study of mouse neurologic mutants has led to a better understanding of the complex mechanisms involved in the development of the nervous system. Because few of these mutations have been identified, molecular probes(More)
Signaling through G-protein-coupled receptors is modulated by a family of regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins that have been implicated in several neurological and psychiatric disorders. Defining the detailed expression patterns and developmental regulation of RGS proteins has been hampered by an absence of antibodies useful for mapping. We have(More)
Synopsis of Program: TPC addresses critical issues and needs regarding the recruitment, preparation, enhancement, and retention of science, technology and mathematics (STM) teachers for grades K-12. Its goals are to improve the quality and coherence of the learning experiences that prepare and enhance STM teachers; to develop innovative resources that(More)
A large family of regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins modulates signaling through G-protein-coupled receptors. Previous studies have implicated RGS4 as a vulnerability gene in schizophrenia. To begin to understand structure-function relationships, we have utilized bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) methods to create transgenic mice that(More)
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