David Attwell

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Anatomic and physiologic data are used to analyze the energy expenditure on different components of excitatory signaling in the grey matter of rodent brain. Action potentials and postsynaptic effects of glutamate are predicted to consume much of the energy (47% and 34%, respectively), with the resting potential consuming a smaller amount (13%), and(More)
Blood flow in the brain is regulated by neurons and astrocytes. Knowledge of how these cells control blood flow is crucial for understanding how neural computation is powered, for interpreting functional imaging scans of brains, and for developing treatments for neurological disorders. It is now recognized that neurotransmitter-mediated signalling has a key(More)
The haemodynamic responses to neural activity that underlie the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the brain are often assumed to be driven by energy use, particularly in presynaptic terminals or glia. However, recent work has suggested that most brain energy is used to power postsynaptic(More)
Energy use, mainly to reverse ion movements in neurons, is a fundamental constraint on brain information processing. Trafficking of mitochondria to locations in neurons where there are large ion fluxes is essential for powering neural function. Mitochondrial trafficking is regulated by Ca2+ entry through ionotropic glutamate receptors, but the underlying(More)
In the past 20 years, an extra layer of information processing, in addition to that provided by neurons, has been proposed for the CNS. Neuronally evoked increases of the intracellular calcium concentration in astrocytes have been suggested to trigger exocytotic release of the 'gliotransmitters' glutamate, ATP and D-serine. These are proposed to modulate(More)
We show that information flow through the adult cerebellar cortex, from the mossy fiber input to the Purkinje cell output, is controlled by furosemide-sensitive, diazepam- and neurosteroid-insensitive GABA(A) receptors on granule cells, which are activated both tonically and by GABA spillover from synaptic release sites. Tonic activation of these receptors(More)
Oligodendrocyte precursors (OPs) continue to proliferate and generate myelinating oligodendrocytes (OLs) well into adulthood. It is not known whether adult-born OLs ensheath previously unmyelinated axons or remodel existing myelin. We quantified OP division and OL production in different regions of the adult mouse CNS including the 4-month-old optic nerve,(More)
Cerebellar granule cells are inhibited phasically by GABA released synaptically from Golgi cells, but are inhibited more powerfully by tonic activity of high affinity alpha 6 subunit-containing GABAA receptors. During development the tonic activity is generated by the accumulation of GABA released by action potentials, but in the adult the tonic activity is(More)
The release of glutamate during brain anoxia or ischaemia triggers the death of neurons, causing mental or physical handicap. The mechanism of glutamate release is controversial, however. Four release mechanisms have been postulated: vesicular release dependent on external calcium or Ca2+ released from intracellular stores; release through(More)
Neural activity increases local blood flow in the central nervous system (CNS), which is the basis of BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) and PET (positron emission tomography) functional imaging techniques. Blood flow is assumed to be regulated by precapillary arterioles, because capillaries lack smooth muscle. However, most (65%) noradrenergic innervation(More)