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Efficient and accurate protein localization is essential to cells and requires protein-targeting machineries to both effectively capture the cargo in the cytosol and productively unload the cargo at the membrane. To understand how these challenges are met, we followed the interaction of translating ribosomes during their targeting by the signal recognition(More)
The signal recognition particle (SRP) and SRP receptor comprise the major cellular machinery that mediates the cotranslational targeting of proteins to cellular membranes. It remains unclear how the delivery of cargos to the target membrane is spatially coordinated. We show here that phospholipid binding drives important conformational rearrangements that(More)
The signal recognition particle (SRP) and its receptor compose a universally conserved and essential cellular machinery that couples the synthesis of nascent proteins to their proper membrane localization. The past decade has witnessed an explosion in in-depth mechanistic investigations of this targeting machine at increasingly higher resolutions. In this(More)
Approximately one-third of the proteome is initially destined for the eukaryotic endoplasmic reticulum or the bacterial plasma membrane. The proper localization of these proteins is mediated by a universally conserved protein-targeting machinery, the signal recognition particle (SRP), which recognizes ribosomes carrying signal sequences and, through(More)
Signal recognition particle (SRP) and its receptor (SR) comprise a highly conserved cellular machine that cotranslationally targets proteins to a protein-conducting channel, the bacterial SecYEG or eukaryotic Sec61p complex, at the target membrane. Whether SecYEG is a passive recipient of the translating ribosome or actively regulates this targeting(More)
The ubiquitin ligase CUL3 is an essential regulator of neural crest specification whose aberrant activation has been linked to autism, schizophrenia, and hypertension. CUL3 exerts its roles by pairing with ∼90 distinct substrate adaptors, yet how the different CUL3-complexes are activated is poorly understood. Here, we show that CUL3 and its adaptor KLHL12(More)