Daphne Vogiagis

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BACKGROUND Standard non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduce the risk of colorectal cancer by 40-60% but the mechanism by which this occurs is uncertain. Selective cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors are potentially ideal chemopreventive agents as they are less toxic than standard NSAIDs. No study has compared the efficacy of these drugs at clinically(More)
In a rodent colorectal cancer model, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs reduce tumor mass by increasing the rate of tumor cell apoptosis and decreasing proliferation. We have examined β-catenin as a potential target for these agents in colorectal cancer. Carcinogen-treated rats were treated for 23 weeks with a range of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.(More)
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use reduces the risk of colorectal cancer by 40-50%. Previous studies suggest that effective inhibition of colorectal cancer by NSAIDs may be dependent on the presence or absence of a K-ras mutation. This study was aimed at determining the relationship between inhibition of colorectal cancer by sulindac and(More)
BACKGROUND Standard non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduce the risk of colorectal cancer; however, their use as preventive agents is limited by their inherent toxicity. Drugs that selectively inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) may be useful in this setting as they are supposedly less toxic. No study has directly compared the ability of standard(More)
Vogiagis, Daphne, Eric M. Glare, Aileen Misajon, Wendy Brown, and Paul E. O’Brien. Cyclooxygenase-1 and an alternatively spliced mRNA in the rat stomach: effects of aging and ulcers. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 278: G820–G827, 2000.—Prostaglandins play a critical role in gastric mucosal cytoprotection and decrease progressively with age.(More)
Prostaglandins play a critical role in gastric mucosal cytoprotection and decrease progressively with age. Cyclooxygenase (COX), the rate-limiting enzyme for prostaglandin synthesis, exists in two isoforms, COX-1 and COX-2. The rat COX-1 gene expresses an alternatively spliced mRNA COX-1 splice variant (SV) that may, at best, code for a truncated COX-1(More)
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduce tumour mass by increasing the rate of tumour cell apoptosis and decreasing cell proliferation. The classically recognized target for NSAID action are the two isoforms of the cyclooxygenase (COX) gene, which is responsible for prostaglandin production. In the rat, the COX-1 gene expresses an alternatively(More)
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