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Support vector machines have met with significant success in numerous real-world learning tasks. However, like most machine learning algorithms, they are generally applied using a randomly selected training set classified in advance. In many settings, we also have the option of using pool-based active learning. Instead of using a randomly selected training(More)
In typical classification tasks, we seek a function which assigns a label to a single object. Kernel-based approaches, such as support vector machines (SVMs), which maximize the margin of confidence of the classifier, are the method of choice for many such tasks. Their popularity stems both from the ability to use high-dimensional feature spaces, and from(More)
The ability to simultaneously localize a robot and accurately map its surroundings is considered by many to be a key prerequisite of truly autonomous robots. However, few approaches to this problem scale up to handle the very large number of landmarks present in real environments. Kalman filter-based algorithms, for example, require time quadratic in the(More)
A large portion of real-world data is stored in commercial relational database systems. In contrast, most statistical learning methods work only with “flat” data representations. Thus, to apply these methods, we are forced to convert our data into a flat form, thereby losing much of the relational structure present in our database. This paper builds on the(More)
We introduce the SCAPE method (Shape Completion and Animation for PEople)---a data-driven method for building a human shape model that spans variation in both subject shape and pose. The method is based on a representation that incorporates both articulated and non-rigid deformations. We learn a <i>pose deformation model</i> that derives the non-rigid(More)
In many supervised learning tasks, the entities to be labeled are related to each other in complex ways and their labels are not independent. For example, in hypertext classification, the labels of linked pages are highly correlated. A standard approach is to classify each entity independently, ignoring the correlations between them. Recently, Probabilistic(More)
High-level, or holistic, scene understanding involves reasoning about objects, regions, and the 3D relationships between them. This requires a representation above the level of pixels that can be endowed with high-level attributes such as class of object/region, its orientation, and (rough 3D) location within the scene. Towards this goal, we propose a(More)
In this paper, we examine a method for feature subset selection based on Information Theory. Initially, a framework for de ning the theoretically optimal, but computationally intractable, method for feature subset selection is presented. We show that our goal should be to eliminate a feature if it gives us little or no additional information beyond that(More)