Daphne A. Onderdonk

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A goal of conservation biology is to determine which types of species are most susceptible to habitat disturbance and which types of disturbed habitats can support particular species. We studied 20 forest fragments outside of Kibale National Park, Uganda, to address this question. At each patch, we determined the presence of primate species, tree species(More)
The biomass of arboreal folivorous primates in Africa and Asia is related to an index of mature leaf quality: the ratio of protein-to-fiber concentration. Investigations have considered variation in folivore biomass and forest composition among sites separated by hundreds or thousands of km. However, large variation in folivore abundance has been documented(More)
Detailed studies of primates and fruiting trees have illustrated that these groups of organisms are involved in a very complex set of interactions, with primates relying on fruiting trees as important food resources and fruiting trees relying on frugivores for seed dispersal. Human activities that influence either primate seed dispersal or fruit production(More)
Jacinta C. Beehner, Daphne A. Onderdonk, Susan C. Alberts, and Jeanne Altmann Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA, Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27701, USA, Institute of Primate Research, National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya, and Department of Conservation Biology, Chicago(More)
Twelve taxa under exploration as bioenergy crops in Florida and the U.S. were evaluated for potential invasiveness using the Australian Weed Risk Assessment system (WRA) modified for separate assessment at the state and national scales. When tested across a range of geographies, this system correctly identifies invaders 90%, and non-invaders 70% of the(More)
Jacinta C. Beehner, Daphne A. Onderdonk, Susan C. Alberts, and Jeanne Altmann Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA, Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27701, USA, Institute of Primate Research, National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya, and Department of Conservation Biology, Chicago(More)
Infanticide by adult males has been indirectly documented or inferred in many instances for a number of primate species, but direct observations of infanticide are relatively rare (HRDY, 1979; BARTLETT et al., 1993). This lack of direct observations makes it difficult to test the several hypotheses proposed to explain infanticidal behavior. A leading(More)
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