Danilo A. Tagle

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A murine model of ataxia telangiectasia was created by disrupting the Atm locus via gene targeting. Mice homozygous for the disrupted Atm allele displayed growth retardation, neurologic dysfunction, male and female infertility secondary to the absence of mature gametes, defects in T lymphocyte maturation, and extreme sensitivity to gamma-irradiation. The(More)
Patients with the genetic disorder ataxia telangiectasia (AT) have mutations in the AT mutated (ATM) gene, which is homologous to TEL1 and the checkpoint gene MEC1. A tel1 deletion mutant, unlike a mec1 deletion, is viable and does not exhibit increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. However, increased dosage of TEL1 rescues sensitivity of a mec1(More)
Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by a pathological expansion of a CAG repeat in the first exon of the gene coding for huntingtin, resulting in an abnormally long polyglutamine stretch. Despite its widespread expression, mutant huntingtin leads to selective neuronal loss in the striatum and cortex. Here we report that the neurospecific phosphoprotein(More)
Excessive activation of NMDA receptors results in excitotoxic nerve cell loss, which is believed to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of Huntington's disease (HD) and several other catastrophic neurodegenerative diseases. Kynurenic acid (KYNA), a neuroinhibitory tryptophan metabolite, has neuroprotective properties and may serve as an endogenous(More)
The purpose of our study was to determine the relationship between mutant huntingtin (Htt) and mitochondrial dynamics in the progression of Huntington's disease (HD). We measured the mRNA levels of electron transport chain genes, and mitochondrial structural genes, Drp1 (dynamin-related protein 1), Fis1 (fission 1), Mfn1 (mitofusin 1), Mfn2 (mitofusin 2),(More)
The genetic distances among primate lineages estimated from orthologous noncoding nucleotide sequences of β-type globin loci and their flanking and intergenic DNA agree closely with the distances (delta T50H values) estimated by cross hybridization of total genomic single-copy DNAs. These DNA distances and the maximum parsimony tree constructed for the(More)
New developments in the treatment and management of phenylketonuria (PKU) as well as advances in molecular testing have emerged since the National Institutes of Health 2000 PKU Consensus Statement was released. An NIH State-of-the-Science Conference was convened in 2012 to address new findings, particularly the use of the medication sapropterin to treat(More)
KAT (kynurenine aminotransferase) II is a primary enzyme in the brain for catalysing the transamination of kynurenine to KYNA (kynurenic acid). KYNA is the only known endogenous antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. The enzyme also catalyses the transamination of aminoadipate to alpha-oxoadipate; therefore it was initially named AADAT(More)
Kynurenine aminotransferase (KAT) is an enzyme responsible for synthesis of kynurenic acid (KYNA), a well established neuroprotective and anticonvulsant agent, involved in synaptic transmission and implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, Huntington's disease and other neurological disorders. We have shown previously that kat2-/- mice had lower(More)
Kynurenine aminotransferase III (KAT III) has been considered to be involved in the production of mammalian brain kynurenic acid (KYNA), which plays an important role in protecting neurons from overstimulation by excitatory neurotransmitters. The enzyme was identified based on its high sequence identity with mammalian KAT I, but its activity toward(More)